2017
DOI: 10.18632/aging.101223
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Abstract: Shelterin forms the core complex of telomere proteins and plays critical roles in protecting telomeres against unwanted activation of the DNA damage response and in maintaining telomere length homeostasis. Although shelterin expression is believed to be ubiquitous for stabilization of chromosomal ends. Evidences suggest that some shelterin subunits have tissue-specific functions. However, very little is known regarding how shelterin subunit gene expression is regulated during development and aging. Using two d… Show more

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Cited by 15 publications
(16 citation statements)
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References 25 publications
(32 reference statements)
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“…Whether telomere shortening concomitant to TRF2 downregulation in skeletal muscle destabilizes the telomere‐ SIRT3 loop, as observed for other loci (Kim et al, ; Robin, Ludlow, et al, ; Robin et al, ), is an interesting hypothesis. Further, if telomere shortens in human tissues, including skeletal muscle (Daniali et al, ), diminution of TRF2, as already reported through lifetime in animal models (e.g., mice, zebrafish; Wagner et al, ), remains to be established in other human tissues. Noteworthy, recent studies focusing on another postmitotic tissue (e.g., heart) also link telomere length and TRF2 level to metabolic changes (Chang et al, , ; Oh et al, ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 93%
“…Whether telomere shortening concomitant to TRF2 downregulation in skeletal muscle destabilizes the telomere‐ SIRT3 loop, as observed for other loci (Kim et al, ; Robin, Ludlow, et al, ; Robin et al, ), is an interesting hypothesis. Further, if telomere shortens in human tissues, including skeletal muscle (Daniali et al, ), diminution of TRF2, as already reported through lifetime in animal models (e.g., mice, zebrafish; Wagner et al, ), remains to be established in other human tissues. Noteworthy, recent studies focusing on another postmitotic tissue (e.g., heart) also link telomere length and TRF2 level to metabolic changes (Chang et al, , ; Oh et al, ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 93%
“…In addition to regulation of gene expression by telomere length, telomeres, subtelomeres, shelterin proteins and telomerase are all themselves subject to epigenetic regulatory mechanisms [ 79 , 151 ]. Of particular note, in mice and zebrafish the mRNA levels from the genes encoding the six shelterin subunits change with age, in a tissue specific fashion [ 152 ], and it will be exciting to test if these changes may impact age-related pathologies.…”
Section: Telomere Structure and Functionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Zebrafish demonstrate agerelated decline in cognition and perception (reviewed in: Adams and Kafaligonul 2018). Age-related mitochondrial dysfunction and oculopathy (Wang et al 2019), nervous system aging and disease (Van houcke et al 2015), agerelated changes in DNA methylation (Shimoda et al 2014), oncology (Barriuso et al 2015), Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (van der Velden and Haramis 2011), telomere attrition (Wagner et al 2017), osteoarthritis (Hayes et al 2013), osteoporosis (Zhang et al 2018), immune system, and endocrine decline have all been described in zebrafish (Arslan-Ergul and Adams 2014; Beis and Agalou 2020; Carneiro et al 2016). In addition, the endocannabinoid system is well-conserved in zebrafish (reviewed in: Oltrabella et al 2017), thus making them an excellent model to study the effects of both cannabinoids and aging.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%