2002
DOI: 10.2498/cit.2002.01.04
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Abstract: SPARK is a toolkit for implementing domain-specific languages in Python. It is somewhat unusual in that its intended audience includes users who do not necessarily have a background in compilation; this choice impacts both the design and implementation of SPARK. We introduce SPARK in this paper and discuss major issues that have arisen in its design and ongoing development.

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Cited by 5 publications
(1 citation statement)
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“…The SPARK toolkit [2] for DSL implementation has similar goals to Neverlang, but it is Python-based. The most interesting part of SPARK is the somewhat curious choice for the parser generator, Earley [12], which is justified by the target audience for the project, that includes users that do not have a background in parser and compiler definition: Earley parsers can handle any context-free grammar, even ambiguous ones.…”
Section: Related Work and Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The SPARK toolkit [2] for DSL implementation has similar goals to Neverlang, but it is Python-based. The most interesting part of SPARK is the somewhat curious choice for the parser generator, Earley [12], which is justified by the target audience for the project, that includes users that do not have a background in parser and compiler definition: Earley parsers can handle any context-free grammar, even ambiguous ones.…”
Section: Related Work and Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%