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“…Short and marginal undulations close to the carinae are a well-known feature of carcharodontosaurid teeth (Sereno et al, 1996;Coria and Currie, 2006) as they appear on the crowns of Carcharodontosaurus (SGM Din-1; UC PV6; MNN IGU6), Concavenator (Cuesta et al, 2018), Giganotosaurus (MUCPv-CH-1), Mapusaurus (MCF-PVPH 108; Figure 20.8) and Tyrannotitan (Canale et al, 2015). Marginal undulations (Figure 20) have also been reported in the abelisaurid Skorpiovenator (Canale et al, 2009) and are present in a large range of non-neocoelurosaur avetheropods: the ceratosaurs Abelisaurus (MC 5, MC 687), Ceratosaurus (USNM 4735; Figure 20.1), Chenanisaurus (Longrich et al, 2017), Majungasaurus (FMNH 2100; Remarks and synapomorphy.…”
Section: Marginal Undulationsmentioning
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“…Short and marginal undulations close to the carinae are a well-known feature of carcharodontosaurid teeth (Sereno et al, 1996;Coria and Currie, 2006) as they appear on the crowns of Carcharodontosaurus (SGM Din-1; UC PV6; MNN IGU6), Concavenator (Cuesta et al, 2018), Giganotosaurus (MUCPv-CH-1), Mapusaurus (MCF-PVPH 108; Figure 20.8) and Tyrannotitan (Canale et al, 2015). Marginal undulations (Figure 20) have also been reported in the abelisaurid Skorpiovenator (Canale et al, 2009) and are present in a large range of non-neocoelurosaur avetheropods: the ceratosaurs Abelisaurus (MC 5, MC 687), Ceratosaurus (USNM 4735; Figure 20.1), Chenanisaurus (Longrich et al, 2017), Majungasaurus (FMNH 2100; Remarks and synapomorphy.…”
Section: Marginal Undulationsmentioning
“…Finally, some diagnostic features are obtained based on this phylogenetic analysis: (1) the presence of more than two posterior surangular foramina (an autapomorphy among theropods) [Modified ch. 132 (2)], (2) the presence of marginal enamel wrinkles (shared with Carcharodontosauridae in this phylogeny, although this character actually has a high level of homoplasy because it turns up several times in the Averostra lineage [42]) [ch.143 (2)]; and (3) the flat anterior surfaces of the presacral vertebrae, in contrast to the convex condition in Tetanurae (an autapomorphy among tetanurans) [ch. 156 (0)].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…The anterior margin of the premaxillary body is almost vertical unlike carcharodontosaurians, which have a posterodorsally inclined margin [11]. The narial fossa is well developed and situated just ventral to the external naris, unlike Concavenator and Acrocanthosaurus [41,42], in which the fossa is situated anterior to the external naris. Only the basalmost part of the supranarial and subnarial processes are preserved in NRRU-F01020001.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
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“…Interestingly, however, these tracks are about the same size as the feet of the well-preserved carcharodontosaurid dinosaur, Concavenator corcovatus (Ortega et al, 2010, Cuesta andFregenal-Martínez, 2012), found in the same locality. A detailed study of the feet of Concavenator revealed the presence of foot pads, the general morphology of their soft parts (Cuesta et al, 2015), and showed the foot phalanges of digit III to be approximately 25.8 cm long, very similar to the 27.5 cm recorded for prints 2 and 3 of LH-Y-1-001.…”
Section: Trackmaker Identificationmentioning