1996
DOI: 10.1016/0021-9290(96)00034-6
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Abstract: Theoretical analyses have shown that rotations of a rigid body about the principal axis corresponding to the intermediate principal moment of inertia are unstable. This poses a potential problem for gymnasts who perform double somersaults without twist in a layout configuration. A computer simulation model is used to investigate configurational strategies for controlling such movements. It is shown that the build up of twist is not reduced by abduction of the arms but can be controlled by adopting a configurat… Show more

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Cited by 26 publications
(19 citation statements)
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References 10 publications
(19 reference statements)
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“…• and so the delay of 0.09 somersaults for stable control is consistent with the earlier study of Yeadon and Mikulcik (1996). For straight double backward somersaults in a floor exercise in gymnastics, the flight time can be as low as 0.8 s (Hwang et al, 1990;Kerwin et al, 1998) and a delay of 0.24 somersaults would correspond to 100 ms.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 71%
See 2 more Smart Citations
“…• and so the delay of 0.09 somersaults for stable control is consistent with the earlier study of Yeadon and Mikulcik (1996). For straight double backward somersaults in a floor exercise in gymnastics, the flight time can be as low as 0.8 s (Hwang et al, 1990;Kerwin et al, 1998) and a delay of 0.24 somersaults would correspond to 100 ms.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 71%
“…• in tilt, twist and somersault. In order to correct for each perturbation the scheme described for non-twisting straight somersaults in Yeadon and Mikulcik (1996) was implemented in which the corrective arm adduction / abduction change over a simulation time step was a proportional plus derivative function of the twist angle at an earlier time. For non-twisting straight somersaults the twist angle was controlled continuously to remain close to zero whereas in the current movement the aim was to control the twist to reach 360…”
Section: Continuous Controlmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…From (10) the limiting value of t 0 is 2/k, with corresponding values of p = k 2 /e and d = 2k/e. This approximate solution is in close agreement with that of Yeadon and Mikulcik (1996). For typical inertia values, the maximum time delay t 0 for wrist, shoulder, and hip strategies are each close to 0.5 s.…”
Section: Control Strategysupporting
confidence: 78%
“…An increase in movement variability associated with a gymnast making feedback corrections would fall under the definition of functional variability since the adjustments have the function of controlling the pace of the giant circle. Feedback control has been demonstrated in a number of gymnastics activities such as hand balance (Yeadon & Trewartha, 2003) and twisting somersaults (Yeadon & Mikulcik, 1996;Yeadon & Hiley, 2014). In both cases the control strategy was based on detecting an error in the desired state and providing a correction, based on the mechanics of the system, after an appropriate time delay (Latash, 1998;Jagacinski & Flach, 2003).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%