2012
DOI: 10.1111/j.1741-5705.2012.03993.x
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Abstract: During a presidential election year, public attention naturally turns toward candidates and campaigns. The best prepared candidates, however, are thinking beyond voting day toward postelection planning. The task of transitioning to become president is enormous. On the personnel side, a new president will have to fill between 3,000 and 4,000 positions. In this article I review the current state of presidential personnel politics. I review the choices confronting presidents and how the personnel process is chang… Show more

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Cited by 11 publications
(5 citation statements)
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References 32 publications
(38 reference statements)
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“…The number of federal political appointees increased steadily during the 1950s–1980s, while overall government employment decreased relative to the U.S. population (Richardson and Pfiffner, , p. 179). While the number of appointees has remained relatively stable since the 1980s, today, an incoming president fills almost 4,000 appointed positions—double the number of such positions as during the middle of the twentieth century (Lewis, , p. 587; Lewis, , p. 48–49).…”
Section: Literature Review and Projected Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The number of federal political appointees increased steadily during the 1950s–1980s, while overall government employment decreased relative to the U.S. population (Richardson and Pfiffner, , p. 179). While the number of appointees has remained relatively stable since the 1980s, today, an incoming president fills almost 4,000 appointed positions—double the number of such positions as during the middle of the twentieth century (Lewis, , p. 587; Lewis, , p. 48–49).…”
Section: Literature Review and Projected Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…By the 1950s, the federal merit system had expanded to cover most executive branch workers. But beginning with the creation of Schedule C positions in 1953, the number and levels of political appointments increased, and by the twenty‐first century there were approximately 4,000 positions that presidents could fill, far more than any other contemporary democracy (Lewis 2012; Moynihan 2021; Pfiffner 2020).…”
Section: The Deep Versus the Shallow Statementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Having laid out the significance of descriptive representation in government, we turn to our theoretical expectations for the role of selection method in promoting diversity among state executive leaders. In making appointment decisions, governors are not unlike presidents filling positions in the federal government, and when presidents make cabinet appointments, they consider diversity among other things such as loyalty, competency, and abilities (Lewis 2012; Patterson and Pfiffner 2001). For example, President Bill Clinton was vocal about his goal for a demographically diverse executive branch (Weko 1995).…”
Section: Theoretical Expectationsmentioning
confidence: 99%