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Cited by 26 publications
(13 citation statements)
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“…More recently, Dennis et al (2006) showed that the interpretation of their own and of previous combustion rate measurements can suggest both a linear and a square root dependence of Sh from the active particle diameter, because of the scatter of data. The authors questioned the latter dependence (consistent with a Frössling-type expression) and preferred a linear one.…”
Section: Combustion Of Carbon Particlesmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…More recently, Dennis et al (2006) showed that the interpretation of their own and of previous combustion rate measurements can suggest both a linear and a square root dependence of Sh from the active particle diameter, because of the scatter of data. The authors questioned the latter dependence (consistent with a Frössling-type expression) and preferred a linear one.…”
Section: Combustion Of Carbon Particlesmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…This assumption is valid under oxygen-free gasification conditions because the residence time of the fines is small (a few seconds) compared to the timescale of their chemical reaction 1,20 . 34,35 . It is assumed that due to limited penetration of reactants through the char, the combustion reaction acts on the surface and therefore decreases both the mass and size of the particle without significantly affecting its density.…”
Section: Mathematical Modelmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…1. It is assumed that CO is the only product of oxidation for char particles burning in fluidized bed and the oxidation of the resulting CO is inhibited by the proximity of sand (Hayhurst, 1991;Hayhurst and Parmar, 1998;Dennis et al, 2005Dennis et al, , 2006. At lower temperatures CO mainly diffuses away from the original carbon particle before burning, but at higher temperatures sand inhibitory effects seem to be negligible and CO does burn to CO 2 close to the carbon (Hayhurst, 1991;Hayhurst and Parmar, 1998;Loeffler and Hofbauer, 2002).…”
Section: Sand Inhibitory Effectsmentioning
confidence: 98%