2017
DOI: 10.18632/aging.101172
View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: For all species, finite metabolic resources must be allocated toward three competing systems: maintenance, reproduction, and growth. Telomeres, the nucleoprotein tips of chromosomes, which shorten with age in most species, are correlated with increased survival. Chick growth is energetically costly and is associated with telomere shortening in most species. To assess the change in telomeres in penguin chicks, we quantified change in telomere length of wild known-age Magellanic penguin (Spheniscus magellanicus)… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1
1
1
1

Citation Types

0
12
2

Year Published

2017
2017
2019
2019

Publication Types

Select...
3

Relationship

1
2

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 12 publications
(14 citation statements)
references
References 61 publications
(74 reference statements)
0
12
2
Order By: Relevance
“…Studies of terminal telomere restriction fragments (TRFs) have shown that telomere length can shorten with increasing age and that the rate of change corresponds to lifespan in several species (Bize, Criscuolo, Metcalfe, Nasir, & Monaghan, ; Juola, Haussmann, Dearborn, & Vleck, ; Tricola et al, ). However, this trend is not consistent amongst all birds, with some species showing increases in TRF with age, as in the Leach's storm‐petrel ( Oceanodroma leucorhoa ) (Haussmann et al, ), and no decline in length, or both as reported for the Magellanic penguin ( Spheniscus magellanicus ) (Cerchiara et al, ). For individuals in some avian species, change in telomere length can be tracked longitudinally and correlate with reproductive timing; however, the use of TRF for cross‐sectional analysis of age has yet to be demonstrated (Bauer et al, ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 95%
“…Studies of terminal telomere restriction fragments (TRFs) have shown that telomere length can shorten with increasing age and that the rate of change corresponds to lifespan in several species (Bize, Criscuolo, Metcalfe, Nasir, & Monaghan, ; Juola, Haussmann, Dearborn, & Vleck, ; Tricola et al, ). However, this trend is not consistent amongst all birds, with some species showing increases in TRF with age, as in the Leach's storm‐petrel ( Oceanodroma leucorhoa ) (Haussmann et al, ), and no decline in length, or both as reported for the Magellanic penguin ( Spheniscus magellanicus ) (Cerchiara et al, ). For individuals in some avian species, change in telomere length can be tracked longitudinally and correlate with reproductive timing; however, the use of TRF for cross‐sectional analysis of age has yet to be demonstrated (Bauer et al, ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 95%
“…A meta‐analysis of 27 studies which measured TL at variable stages suggests that longer telomeres are associated with better survival (Wilbourn et al, ). Similarly, studies which investigate early‐life TL and survival have also demonstrated positive TL effects on short‐term survival (post growth period or fledging in birds (Geiger et al, ; Stier et al, ; Watson, Bolton, & Monaghan, )) or first year survival (Cram, Monaghan, Gillespie, & Clutton‐Brock, ; Salmón, Nilsson, Watson, Bensch, & Isaksson, ) but not always (Boonekamp, Mulder, Salomons, Dijkstra, & Verhulst, ; Cerchiara et al, ; McLennan et al, ; Stier et al, ; Ujvari & Madsen, ; Vedder et al, ). However, because extrinsic factors are always likely to be a major cause of mortality and TL‐associated mortality is likely to diminish with age (Boonekamp, Simons, Hemerik, & Verhulst, ), the predictive effect of early‐life TL on survival may be age‐dependent under natural conditions, a plausible yet untested hypothesis in the wild (Supporting Information Table ).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 97%
“…year survival (Cram, Monaghan, Gillespie, & Clutton-Brock, 2017;Salmón, Nilsson, Watson, Bensch, & Isaksson, 2017) but not always (Boonekamp, Mulder, Salomons, Dijkstra, & Verhulst, 2014;Cerchiara et al, 2017;McLennan et al, 2017;Stier et al, 2014;Ujvari & Madsen, 2009;Vedder et al, 2017). However, because extrinsic factors are always likely to be a major cause of mortality and TL-associated mortality is likely to diminish with age (Boonekamp, Simons, Hemerik, & Verhulst, 2013), the predictive effect of earlylife TL on survival may be age-dependent under natural conditions, a plausible yet untested hypothesis in the wild (Supporting Information Table S1).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…We measured telomere length by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), as in Cerchiara et al. (2017). …”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…We extracted DNA from a lightly centrifuged cell pack, consisting primarily of erythrocytes (Qiagen DNeasy Mini-kit), and then quantified DNA via NanoDrop spectrophotometer (mean 260/280 ratio ± SE = 1.85 ± 0.02). We measured telomere length by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), as in Cerchiara et al (2017).…”
Section: Sample Collection and Dna Extractionmentioning
confidence: 99%