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Abstract: Games are widely recognized for their potential to enhance students' learning. Yet they are only rarely used in classrooms because they cannot be modified to meet the needs of a particular class. This article describes a novel approach to creating educational software that addresses this problem: provide an interface specifically for teachers that enables them to define the content of the games, and track the impact on their students' learning. The games themselves use physical interfaces and multimedia to enc… Show more

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“…The decision of incorporating educational networked games into the classroom does not only involve the assessment of the personalized learning in students, but it is also related to the interaction that instructors have with these devices. Scarlatos and Scarlatos (2008) have set a precedent for this type effort by developing interfaces that allow teachers to co-design instructional events that can be delivered via learning games. For this reason, future research should also take into consideration the points of view, perceptions, and limitations of teachers in terms of these learning games.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
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“…The decision of incorporating educational networked games into the classroom does not only involve the assessment of the personalized learning in students, but it is also related to the interaction that instructors have with these devices. Scarlatos and Scarlatos (2008) have set a precedent for this type effort by developing interfaces that allow teachers to co-design instructional events that can be delivered via learning games. For this reason, future research should also take into consideration the points of view, perceptions, and limitations of teachers in terms of these learning games.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
“…Several reports gathered from the review suggest that there is an emerging emphasis in schools on active and personalized learning, which could be achieved through learning games (Scarlatos & Scarlatos, 2008). Learning games, if designed with identified features in mind, could assist decision-makers when considering the adoption of instructional technologies aimed at personalized learning to target the following: personalized feedback, student assessment, and deeper learning (Cator & Adams, 2012;Woolf, 2010).…”
Section: Personalized Learning: Identifying Priority Areas For Learnimentioning
“…This software is easy to use, free of charge and often installed by default on many computers. These sessions could appeal to a wider audience, as they are more visually engaging and can go more in-depth than writing everything out on a Webpage (Scarlatos & Scarlatos 2009). Other universities had success implementing and evaluating Adobe Captivate tutorials for similar purposes (Daniels 2006).…”
Section: Captivatementioning
“…Librarians need to align online activities with course assessment tasks, such as finding scholarly journal articles for a research assignment. An emphasis on multimedia content is often better than simple text: pictures, audio/video clips, and even short games could enhance learning (Scarlatos & Scarlatos 2009). Visual learners would appreciate graphical content in different ICT formats, although others may find ICT instruction difficult if they do not possess the necessary computer skills.…”
Section: Adult Learnersmentioning