2016
DOI: 10.18632/aging.101046
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Abstract: At present, we have no reliable means of recovering cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. We hypothesized that homocysteic acid (HA) in the blood might represent one such pathogen that could be excreted into the urine. Since DHA is known to reduce circulating levels of homocysteine, and since exercise attenuates this effect, it follows that supplementation of the diet with DHA, along with increased levels of physical activity, may help to reduce cognitive impairment in AD patients. Our hyp… Show more

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Cited by 1 publication
(42 citation statements)
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“…In order to elucidate mechanistical details, future experiments will be helpful. As summarized by Hasegawa and Ukai, the oxidative metabolite HCA is also suggested to be increased by oxidative stress via amyloid pathology [ 59 ]. However, our data do not confirm a significant elevation of serum HCA compared to the WT control.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In order to elucidate mechanistical details, future experiments will be helpful. As summarized by Hasegawa and Ukai, the oxidative metabolite HCA is also suggested to be increased by oxidative stress via amyloid pathology [ 59 ]. However, our data do not confirm a significant elevation of serum HCA compared to the WT control.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%