2005
DOI: 10.1590/s1516-89132005000300007
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Synergic interaction between ascorbic acid and antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

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Cited by 34 publications
(24 citation statements)
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“…[48, 49] Bacterial viability assays were performed in nutrient conditions to determine the concentration of chitosan required to reduce bacteria viability in 4 h by 4 logs (i.e., 99.99% killing), which hereafter is referred to as the minimum bactericidal concentration or MBC. Given that ascorbic acid is bactericidal against P. aeruginosa with synergistic efficacy depending on the antibiotic,[31, 50] we also evaluated the combination of S -nitrosothiol-modified chitosan oligosaccharides and ascorbic acid. Both the MBC for the NO-releasing chitosan oligosaccharides and the fractional bactericidal concentration index (FBC) of NO-releasing chitosan at different concentrations of ascorbic acid (i.e., 0.1 and 0.5 mg/mL) are provided in Table 3.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…[48, 49] Bacterial viability assays were performed in nutrient conditions to determine the concentration of chitosan required to reduce bacteria viability in 4 h by 4 logs (i.e., 99.99% killing), which hereafter is referred to as the minimum bactericidal concentration or MBC. Given that ascorbic acid is bactericidal against P. aeruginosa with synergistic efficacy depending on the antibiotic,[31, 50] we also evaluated the combination of S -nitrosothiol-modified chitosan oligosaccharides and ascorbic acid. Both the MBC for the NO-releasing chitosan oligosaccharides and the fractional bactericidal concentration index (FBC) of NO-releasing chitosan at different concentrations of ascorbic acid (i.e., 0.1 and 0.5 mg/mL) are provided in Table 3.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[29, 30] Ascorbic acid or vitamin C is a natural antioxidant present in the body, which has demonstrated synergistic antibacterial efficacy with antibiotics including chloramphenicol, kanamycin, streptomycin, and tetracycline against P. aeruginosa . [31] As a reducing agent, ascorbic acid allowed for triggered S -nitrosothiols decomposition and subsequent NO release. [32] To date, no study has examined the ability to prepare S -nitrosothiol-modified chitosan or evaluate the potential synergistic antibacterial efficacy of such materials with ascorbic acid as a trigger for NO release.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In In vitro study, it was observed that ascorbic acid enhanced the activity of antibiotics against isolated uropathogens when used in combination with antibiotics. Substances that enhance the activity of antibiotics or reverse the antibiotic resistance are classified as modifiers of antibiotic activity [33] and this study suggests that ascorbic acid is antibiotic modifier. Ascorbic acid supplementation with antibiotics provides protection against adhesion by uropathogens and colonization within the urinary tract and this agrees with the results obtained from the present study [33,34].…”
Section: Ascorbic Acidmentioning
confidence: 88%
“…Susceptibility of bacterial isolates to seventeen different antibiotics was studied using the disc diffusion method (Cursino et al, 2005). Bacterial isolates were subcultured on nutrient agar plates at 37ºC for 24 h. Bacterial suspension was prepared using few separate colonies for each isolate and 1-2 ml of phosphate buffer.…”
Section: Antibiotic Susceptibility Of Isolated Bacterialmentioning
confidence: 99%