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Cited by 18 publications
(17 citation statements)
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“…Our results suggest that the flow over the skin of freely swimming sharks needs to be considered as being dynamic because the skin both of the body and on fin surfaces moves in a pitch-and heavelike manner during locomotion (Flammang et al, 2011;Wilga and Lauder, 2002), and water is likely to separate over the relatively blunt leading edge (Lane and Loehrke, 1980;Ota and Itasaka, 1976) that characterizes many fish fins (Lauder, 2011). Most sharks do not swim at high speed for the majority of their daily activity pattern, and common cruising speeds for many sharks, including those species classically considered to be high-speed specialists, fall in the range of 0.5-1.0 body lengths s .…”
Section: D Printed Shark Skin Under Dynamic Conditionsmentioning
confidence: 93%
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“…Our results suggest that the flow over the skin of freely swimming sharks needs to be considered as being dynamic because the skin both of the body and on fin surfaces moves in a pitch-and heavelike manner during locomotion (Flammang et al, 2011;Wilga and Lauder, 2002), and water is likely to separate over the relatively blunt leading edge (Lane and Loehrke, 1980;Ota and Itasaka, 1976) that characterizes many fish fins (Lauder, 2011). Most sharks do not swim at high speed for the majority of their daily activity pattern, and common cruising speeds for many sharks, including those species classically considered to be high-speed specialists, fall in the range of 0.5-1.0 body lengths s .…”
Section: D Printed Shark Skin Under Dynamic Conditionsmentioning
confidence: 93%
“…Flammang et al, 2011;Wilga and Lauder, 2002). Fish fins often possess blunt leading edges (Lauder, 2011) and the biomimetic skin membranes tested here possess a similar thickness to length ratio to many fish fins. St numbers ranged up to almost 0.2, and although this is somewhat lower than the number seen for most fishes swimming at moderate to high speeds (Triantafyllou and Triantafyllou, 1995) (reflecting the relatively stiff nature of the foils with a central plastic supporting element with two layers of 3D printed material on each side), it is well within the range used by many swimming fishes, especially at slower speeds (Lauder and Tytell, 2006).…”
Section: Design and Testing Of Biomimetic Shark Skinmentioning
confidence: 96%
“…There is also a growing body of literature on the hydrodynamics of swimming (for reviews, see Lauder and Tytell, 2006;Lauder, 2011). However, hydrodynamic studies have focused on cyclic swimming more so than non-cyclic behaviours (Wolfgang et al, 1999;Müller et al, 2008;Tytell and Lauder, 2008;Gazzola et al, 2012).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…But studying how fish generate the external fluid force to swim has proven to be difficult and is limited in the ability of controlling for parameters in a precise and repeatable manner. There still exists several important questions about kinematic effects on the hydrodynamics [6]. In many previous studies of fish swimming, the fish undulatory body and flapping caudal fin kinematics are treated together as a derivable mathematical wave [7] [8].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In many previous studies of fish swimming, the fish undulatory body and flapping caudal fin kinematics are treated together as a derivable mathematical wave [7] [8]. Nevertheless, recent biological findings indicate that the caudal fin undergoes complex kinematics independent of the body in lots of bony fishes [6]. Both body undulation and caudal fin flapping play essential roles while a fish is swimming.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%