1957
DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2621.1957.tb17002.x View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Sweet substances are noted for their dissimilarity in chemical structure and their marked differences in intensity. The problem of the sweetness of various substances is ever present with the food scientist, especially so when formulation of a product requires substitution of one sweetener for another. The ratio of the sweetnesses of the two products must then be determined. Information in this area is available but from sources using different methods of measurement and different concentrations for comparison… Show more

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“…These fmdings are in good agreement with the study by Schutz and Pilgrim (1957). Using geometric stimulus spacing and a 9-point category scale, also with verbal descriptors, Schutz and Pilgrim obtained psychophysical functions for sucrose, fructose (levulose), and glucose (dextrose) that are very similar in shape to those in Figure 5; that is, in a semilog plot the curves for sucrose and fructose are straight lines, while the glucose function is curvilinear.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
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“…These fmdings are in good agreement with the study by Schutz and Pilgrim (1957). Using geometric stimulus spacing and a 9-point category scale, also with verbal descriptors, Schutz and Pilgrim obtained psychophysical functions for sucrose, fructose (levulose), and glucose (dextrose) that are very similar in shape to those in Figure 5; that is, in a semilog plot the curves for sucrose and fructose are straight lines, while the glucose function is curvilinear.…”
Section: Resultssupporting
“…This feature is seen in most of the results of the experiments by Schutz and Pilgrim (1957) who used a category procedure to scale the sweetness of various compounds. It is instructive to compare the category scale of Schutz and Pilgrim with the magnitude scale for sucrose presented in Fig.…”
Section: Rinse Vs No Rinsementioning
“…The method contrasts with the well-known category rating scale, which is often used, but which restricts the O's responses to a finite set of numbers or adjectives. For an example of the use of a finite category scale, see the study of sweetness by Schutz and Pilgrim (1957).For reasons dealt with at length by Stevens and Galanter (1957), the category scale does not reveal the form of the psychophysical function that relates sensory intensity to stimulus intensity. Magnitude estimation, on the other hand, can, in principle, lead directly to a reasonably good estimate of the psychophysical function.…”
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“…The relative sweetness of a number of natural and synthetic sweeteners was measured using suprathreshold rather than absolute threshold measurements. This study made it clear that using absolute thresholds with real foods was generally inappropriate (Schutz & Pilgrim, 1957b). The first systematic study of interactions of suprathreshold taste stimuli was conducted, and it was found that in most cases the effects were those of simple enhancement or masking.…”
Section: Sensory Psychophysicsmentioning