Risk Habitat Megacity 2011
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-11544-8_4
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Abstract: The main objective of this chapter is to reflect on one element of the conceptual frame for urban development analysis -the goal dimension of the sustainability vision -and its application to the case of Santiago de Chile. The chapter provides essential insights into the sustainability concept in general and the current situation, debates and controversies in Santiago de Chile in particular. Basic sustainability documents are discussed in terms of their local applicability and potential for associated programm… Show more

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Cited by 9 publications
(2 citation statements)
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References 13 publications
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“…Aunque el informe nal del proyecto fue entregado en la conferencia de cierre de la iniciativa en octubre de 2010, dos libros que sintetizan los resultados fueron publicados recién a nes de 2011 (Barton & Kopfmüller, 2011;Heinrichs, Krellenberg, Hansjürgens & Martínez, 2011), complementados por un video sobre el caso de Santiago, un atlas y un panorama comparativo regional del desempeño metropolitano de sustentabilidad.…”
Section: Expectativas Y Resultadosunclassified
“…Contrary to most sustainability concepts, the basic idea here is to avoid defining sustainable development along 'classic' economic, ecological, and social lines. Instead, the IHSC begins with the constitutive elements of the sustainability overall concept, derived from key documents such as the Brundtland Report, the Rio Declaration, and Agenda 21: (a) the postulate of inter-and intragenerational justice, (b) the global perspective, and (c) the anthropocentric view [19][20][21][22], that are translated into three general goals: to secure human existence, maintain society's productive potential, and preserve society's options for development and action. These goals are further concretized by a set of sustainability rules, such as the satisfaction of basic needs, equal access to education and information, the ability to provide for oneself, the sustainable use of renewable and nonrenewable resources, an adequate development of human and knowledge capital, maintenance of social resources, or the preservation of cultural heritage and cultural diversity.…”
Section: Sustainability Evaluationmentioning
confidence: 99%