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Cited by 46 publications
(3 citation statements)
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References 5 publications
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“…1We chose 110 years as the cutoff in attempts to accommodate optimism pertaining to one’s lifespan while balancing concerns with realistic and attentive responding. In the United States, approximately 0.02% of the population lives to an age of 100 years or older (United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division 2017), and the chances of living to 110 once reaching 100 are lower (about 1 in 1,000; Maier, Gampe, Jeune, Vaupel, & Robine, 2010). However, because lifespan appears to be increasing (Kontis et al, 2017) and knowledge of these exact probabilities is likely not commonplace, we chose 110 as the threshold for exclusions.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…1We chose 110 years as the cutoff in attempts to accommodate optimism pertaining to one’s lifespan while balancing concerns with realistic and attentive responding. In the United States, approximately 0.02% of the population lives to an age of 100 years or older (United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division 2017), and the chances of living to 110 once reaching 100 are lower (about 1 in 1,000; Maier, Gampe, Jeune, Vaupel, & Robine, 2010). However, because lifespan appears to be increasing (Kontis et al, 2017) and knowledge of these exact probabilities is likely not commonplace, we chose 110 as the threshold for exclusions.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…A logistic curve-type in the female and male age pattern of mortality can be seen in Figure 3 (Thatcher et al, 1998). In this Figure, the estimate of a constant death rate of 0.7 above age 110, stemming from supercentenarian research, is also included (Maier et al, 2010).…”
Section: Age Pattern Of Mortality After the Age Of 80 Yearsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In recent decades, continuous improvements achieved in human survival have stimulated studies and researches in various disciplines about the limit of lifespan (Olshansky et al, 1990;Parsons, 1996;Kannisto, 1996;Robine et al, 1997;Gavrilov & Gavrilova 2001;Vallin & Meslé, 2001;Carnes et al, 2003;Barbi et al, 2008), the increasing presence of centenarians and their main characteristics (see, among others, Jeune & Vaupel, 1995;Vaupel, 2000;Vaupel & Robine, 2002;Coles, 2003;Robine & Caselli 2005;Maier et al, 2010) and the possible determinants of their "successful" ageing (see, among others, Allard et al, 1996;Franceschi et al, 2000;Caselli & Lipsi, 2006;Willcox et al, 2006;Christensen et al, 2006;Franceschi et al, 2007;Murabito et al, 2012;Brooks-Wilson, 2013).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%