2004
DOI: 10.1590/s1677-55382004000200007
View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Abstract: Low-flow priapism can result in impotence if treatment is delayed, yet patients with recurrent priapism often suffer delay before therapy. We describe management of recurrent priapism using selfadministered injections of intracavernosal metaraminol (Aramine, Merck), a long-acting vasoconstricting amine that is considered safer than epinephrine. The patient injects as often as once daily using 5-10 mg of drug. Our patient reports rapid detumescence and has not required emergency room visits since starting inje… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3
1
1

Citation Types

0
18
0

Year Published

2011
2011
2017
2017

Publication Types

Select...
3

Relationship

0
3

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 23 publications
(18 citation statements)
references
References 2 publications
(18 reference statements)
0
18
0
Order By: Relevance
“…[23] As metaraminol is low acting and highly specific it is considered safe for self-injection. For patients with stuttering priapism, who are able to inject themselves, this course of treatment could prevent trips of hospital during episodes and reduce the duration of ischemia, thereby minimising cavernosal damage.…”
Section: Sympathomimeticsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[23] As metaraminol is low acting and highly specific it is considered safe for self-injection. For patients with stuttering priapism, who are able to inject themselves, this course of treatment could prevent trips of hospital during episodes and reduce the duration of ischemia, thereby minimising cavernosal damage.…”
Section: Sympathomimeticsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The use of vasodilator agents such as pentoxifylline (12), as well as several anti-androgenic drugs such as flutamide, bicalutamide (10) and cyproterone acetate (5,10,12) have been used to prevent further attacks. Some authors recommend managing recurrent priapism in selected cases of adults with the use of selfadministered intracavernosal injections of alphaadrenergic agonists such as metaraminol, etilefrine and epinephrine (15)(16)(17); however, this is not practical in the case of children. Okpala et al (13) reported a good clinical response with the alpha-adrenergic agonist, etilefrine (50-100 mg/d), in 13/18 adults with recurrent priapism (72%), 17 of whom had SCD.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…1,2 All patients should be monitored for potential side effects resulting from the use of a-agonists and entry into the systemic circulation. 69 It is important to note that while the administration of sympathomimetics to treat acute priapism attacks have been used since 1986, none of these commonly used medications are approved under the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of priapism, despite their reported beneficial effects. 69,70 Below is a list of some commonly used sympathomimetic agents and studies supporting their use in the treatment of stuttering priapism.…”
Section: Intracavernosal Injectionsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Metaraminol is a long-acting potent sympathomimetic amine whose vasoconstrictive properties are considered safer than epinephrine; however, common side effects may include hypertension, coronary ischemia, cardiac arrhythmias and death. 41,69 In a single-case study, a sickle-cell trait carrying patient was successfully treated for stuttering priapism by injecting once weekly 5-10 mg metaraminol. Complete detumescence was reported within 3-10 min following the injection.…”
Section: Intracavernosal Injectionsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation