1959
DOI: 10.1210/endo-64-4-559
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Abstract: In an attempt to ascertain whether or not thyroxine can change hypothalamic as well as pituitary activity in regulating thyrotropin secretion, microinjections of thyroxine were made directly into a localized area of the hj'pothalamus or into the anterior pituitary. Determination of thyroid secretion was utilized in evaluating possible changes in thyrotropin secretion. Inhibition of thyrotropin secretion was produced by injection of thyroxine into either the "thyrotropin area" of the hypothalamus or into the an… Show more

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Cited by 47 publications
(12 citation statements)
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References 8 publications
(8 reference statements)
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“…Yamada and Gree [50] suggested that the site of action for T4 may be both on the hypothalamus and on the pituitary gland, and Yamada [49] demonstrated that T4 injections into the paraventricular region could sup press thyroidal radioiodine metabolism. This was further supported by Kajihara and Kendall [32] using T4-agar pel lets implanted in the paraventricular region.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Yamada and Gree [50] suggested that the site of action for T4 may be both on the hypothalamus and on the pituitary gland, and Yamada [49] demonstrated that T4 injections into the paraventricular region could sup press thyroidal radioiodine metabolism. This was further supported by Kajihara and Kendall [32] using T4-agar pel lets implanted in the paraventricular region.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…December 1977 lesion or the microinjection of thyroid hormone into the hypothalamus or the TRH bioassay of hypophyseal portal blood. (Greer, 1951;Yamada and Greer, 1959;Wilber and Porter, 1970) However, there is a discrepancy in the results as to the effect of microinjection of thyroid hormone into the hypothalamus. (Yamada and Greer, 1959;Bogdanove and Crabill, 1961) Moreover, the systemic administration of thyroid hormone could not reduce the thyrotropinreleasing activity of hypophyseal portal blood.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…(Greer, 1951;Yamada and Greer, 1959;Wilber and Porter, 1970) However, there is a discrepancy in the results as to the effect of microinjection of thyroid hormone into the hypothalamus. (Yamada and Greer, 1959;Bogdanove and Crabill, 1961) Moreover, the systemic administration of thyroid hormone could not reduce the thyrotropinreleasing activity of hypophyseal portal blood. Porter, 1970) Reichlin andhis co-workers (1972), on the other hand, have suggested that thyroid hormone would accelerate the synthesis of hypothalamic TRH in vitro.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Chronic morphine or placebo treatment consisted o f im plantation of I pellet on day I followed by 2 additional pellets on day 3. This regimen has been used previously to produce symptoms o f mor phine dependence and tolerance |28, [30][31][32]. Rats were then injected with saline or I.…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…There is now strong evidence that opiates can alter anterior pi tuitary hormone secretion by actions at the hypothalamus and /o r at the pituitary [3,4,15,20]. The effects of opiates on pituitary hormone secretion appear to vary with the endocrine status of the animal [2,7,8].The regulation of thyrotropin (TSH) secretion is influenced by opiates acting at the level of the pituitary a n d /o r hypothala mus [13,14,19,26], Opiates and endogenous opioid peptides (EOPs) have been demonstrated to have both an inhibitory [ 13,14,16,17,21,23,26] and stimulatory [14,17,22,23,26) effect on basal a n d /o r stimulated thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and TSH secretion.The hypothesis for the existence of a 'TSH center' or 'thyrostat' within the hypothalamus which is sensitive to circulating thyroid hormone and thus can secondarily control TSH secreReceived: January 31, 1990 Accepted after revision: March 21, 1990 tion by the pituitary is not new [32]; however, the role of brain opioid systems in regulating the activity of the thyrostat is un known. We have previously reported that for the luteinizing hormone (LH)-secretory mechanism, chronic opiate receptor stimulation with morphine increases the sensitivity of the hypo thalamus to the circulating concentrations of steroid hormones [7,8] and enhances both the positive ]8] and negative [7 ,8] feed back response of the 'gonadostat' to these steroids.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%