2011
DOI: 10.1080/10916460902839230 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Petroleum coke (petcoke) is an inexpensive potential fuel. However, its use has been limited because of the low volatile content and high sulfur contents. Moreover, research work has been extended for reducing the sulfur contents in petcoke. However, there is still no commercially established process of desulfurization of petcoke. Studies have been extended on the desulfurization of two petcoke samples. Interesting results were obtained by employing the techniques such as organorefining; that is, solvent extra… Show more

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“…According to the composition of the crude oil and coking process, the type of sulfur in HSPC could be categorized into organic sulfur (> 99.8%) and inorganic sulfur (Zhong et al 2018a), in which thiophene derivatives are the most popular organic sulfur and mainly attached to the aromatic carbon skeleton and the branch of paraffin on the surface of Edited by Xiu-Qiu Peng the aromatic ring (Zhao et al 2018;Li et al 2019a). Currently, the desulfurization methods for HSPC include the calcination method, vacuum calcination (Chen et al 2017;Ishihara et al 2005;Xiao et al 2016), hot alkali calcination (Agarwal, Sharma 2011), hydrodesulfurization and catalytic oxidative desulfurization method (Ganiyu et al 2017;Toledo-Antonio et al 2017). Among them, catalytic oxidative desulfurization strategy has shown attracted extensive attention due to its low cost and high efficiency, and the highly efficient catalyst is recognized to be the crucial factor influencing the desulfurization performance of this process.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
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“…According to the composition of the crude oil and coking process, the type of sulfur in HSPC could be categorized into organic sulfur (> 99.8%) and inorganic sulfur (Zhong et al 2018a), in which thiophene derivatives are the most popular organic sulfur and mainly attached to the aromatic carbon skeleton and the branch of paraffin on the surface of Edited by Xiu-Qiu Peng the aromatic ring (Zhao et al 2018;Li et al 2019a). Currently, the desulfurization methods for HSPC include the calcination method, vacuum calcination (Chen et al 2017;Ishihara et al 2005;Xiao et al 2016), hot alkali calcination (Agarwal, Sharma 2011), hydrodesulfurization and catalytic oxidative desulfurization method (Ganiyu et al 2017;Toledo-Antonio et al 2017). Among them, catalytic oxidative desulfurization strategy has shown attracted extensive attention due to its low cost and high efficiency, and the highly efficient catalyst is recognized to be the crucial factor influencing the desulfurization performance of this process.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…Sulfur, in particular, is a problematic contaminant, can be present in amounts of~7 wt%, and exists as both inorganic (e.g., sulfur salts) and organic forms (e.g., thiophene) [3]. Many studies have focused on the removal of sulfur from petcoke [4][5][6][7], but the organic sulfur species are integrated with the petcoke aliphatic or aromatic structure and are difficult to remove [3]. Instead of removing the sulfur, there is potential to use petcoke as a precursor for preparing carbon-based catalysts such as solid acid catalysts that have sulfur-containing surface functional groups as active sites.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning