2009
DOI: 10.1080/10916460701434647 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: The structure of coke from five spent residue hydrotreating catalysts was investigated based on ruthenium ion catalyzed oxidation reaction. The distribution of n-alkyl chains and bridges attached to aromatic carbon of coke on catalysts was quantified. Results showed the concentrations of n-alkyl chains and bridges in coke were declined with the increase of carbon number. The substituential group is methyl mainly, and it had no >C 5 alkyl chains in coke. Various isomeric benzenepolycarboxylic acids from oxidate… Show more

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“…However, by combining the compositions of all other products, the most likely logical explanation for the formation of dicarboxylic acids is from oxidized naphthenic ring in the partial saturated aromatics, based on the presence of (1) abundant 1,4-butanedioic acid, 1,5-pentanedioic acid, and 1,6-hexanedioic acid, which were the only dicarboxylic acids detected in the RICO products; (2) increased abundance of these compounds in deep hydroprocessed products; and (3) the longest alkyl chain of fatty acids which was C 5 [88].…”
Section: Carbon Residue On Catalystmentioning
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“…However, by combining the compositions of all other products, the most likely logical explanation for the formation of dicarboxylic acids is from oxidized naphthenic ring in the partial saturated aromatics, based on the presence of (1) abundant 1,4-butanedioic acid, 1,5-pentanedioic acid, and 1,6-hexanedioic acid, which were the only dicarboxylic acids detected in the RICO products; (2) increased abundance of these compounds in deep hydroprocessed products; and (3) the longest alkyl chain of fatty acids which was C 5 [88].…”
Section: Carbon Residue On Catalystmentioning