2009
DOI: 10.1159/000235863
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Stretching Exercise Program Improves Gait in the Elderly

Abstract: Background: Ageing is characterized by a number of physical changes that contribute to a decline in the ability to perform daily tasks. Stretching has been proposed to reduce hip flexion contracture and increase hip and pelvis range of motion, thus improving gait performance. Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether a supervised stretching program designed to improve the range of motion of the lower limbs alters gait kinematics in older adults. Methods: Twenty healthy older adult women (65… Show more

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Cited by 49 publications
(67 citation statements)
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“…Add up the results of the study by Cristopoliski, Barela, Leite, Fowler, and Rodacki (2009), who identified increased pitch size, velocity and reduction of support periods in the elderly people. In a cross-sectional study, Souza, Kirchner, and Rodacki (2015) valuated the effects of stretching on the gait of elderly women and found significant differences in gait speed and muscle activation.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Add up the results of the study by Cristopoliski, Barela, Leite, Fowler, and Rodacki (2009), who identified increased pitch size, velocity and reduction of support periods in the elderly people. In a cross-sectional study, Souza, Kirchner, and Rodacki (2015) valuated the effects of stretching on the gait of elderly women and found significant differences in gait speed and muscle activation.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Such gains, with long-term effects, have been observed after training via heavyweight muscle exercises, stretching, Tai-chi movements, and/or walking programs (Cristopoliski et al, 2009;Gatts and Woollacott, 2006;Giné-Garriga et al, 2010; for a review, see Granacher et al, 2008;Malatesta et al, 2010). The reported benefits of physical training programs on gait and balance could improve the safety and mobility of older pedestrians, particularly by decreasing both the risk and the fear of falling outside of the home, and maybe by increasing walking speed for crossing the street.…”
Section: Training Programs For Older Pedestriansmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Thus, the results found in this research regarding the higher prevalence of the medium high-high probability of hospitalization, and the decline in muscle flexibility and loss of muscle strength in older adults are understandable. Lower limbs flexibility and muscle strength present positive linkage with the physical activity level 26,27 , which presents, in turn, a robust association with morbimortality 28 . We believe that older adults independence assessment in factors that comprise the PC produces less onerous interventions that meet the needs of this population 29 .…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 90%