2004
DOI: 10.1111/j.1461-0248.2004.00626.x
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Abstract: We show with a model that variation in environmental stress between generations facilitates the evolution of stress resistance through assortative mating. Stress induces delayed maturation of susceptible phenotypes, segregating their fertile period from resistant phenotypes. Assortment of mates enhances the responsiveness of populations to natural selection by inflating genetic variance. Thus, positive selection and inflated genetic variance in stressful environments can cause a strong evolutionary increase in… Show more

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Cited by 12 publications
(14 citation statements)
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References 34 publications
(30 reference statements)
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“…In such cases, plants 'mate' (exchange pollen) nonrandomly with others showing a similar level of damage; that is, there can be assortative mating based on damage levels that reflect underlying resistance phenotype. This facilitates fixation of resistance alleles, even if they show a modest net cost in the short term [51].…”
Section: Interactions With Mutualists: Pollinatorsmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…In such cases, plants 'mate' (exchange pollen) nonrandomly with others showing a similar level of damage; that is, there can be assortative mating based on damage levels that reflect underlying resistance phenotype. This facilitates fixation of resistance alleles, even if they show a modest net cost in the short term [51].…”
Section: Interactions With Mutualists: Pollinatorsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Conversely, costs of resistance can result in delayed onset of flowering of resistant hosts. Both cases will result in assortative mating within resistant and susceptible genotypic classes, yielding varied evolutionary responses [51]. The consequences of this phenological assortment are just beginning to be explored theoretically and experimentally and open new avenues of research.…”
Section: Future Directionsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Stress‐induced changes in flowering time present another mechanism for stress to promote evolution in heterogeneous environments via assortative mating. Assortative mating, in general, is likely important for plant evolution (Ennos and Dodson ; Fox ; Weis and Kossler ; Winterer and Weis ; Weis et al. ).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Stress-induced changes in flowering time present another mechanism for stress to promote evolution in heterogeneous environments via assortative mating. Assortative mating, in general, is likely important for plant evolution (Ennos and Dodson 1987;Fox 2003;Weis and Kossler 2004;Winterer and Weis 2004;Weis et al 2005). The current results suggest that the potential for divergence between subpopulations via HISF depends on how stressors affect the direction of phenology shifts, and temper conclusions by previous studies that promote phenotypic plasticity in flowering time as a means to facilitate evolutionary divergence (e.g., Stam 1983;Gavrilets and Vose 2007;Levin 2009).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The costs and benefits associated with synchrony suggest a model of stabilizing selection on phenology. However, phenology, even if highly heritable, may vary from year to year due to environmental effects (Post et al 2001;Winterer & Weiss 2004), with demographic consequences. Hence, understanding the causes and consequences of synchrony are relevant to understanding shortterm population dynamics and the ultimate causes of seasonal phenology.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%