Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
3
2

Citation Types

1
11
0

Year Published

2005
2005
2015
2015

Publication Types

Select...
3

Relationship

0
3

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 28 publications
(12 citation statements)
references
References 40 publications
1
11
0
Order By: Relevance
“…This represents a fundamental task in orthodontics because of the relationships existing between mechanical stimulus of PDL and functional adaptation of the adjacent alveolar bone. Compression, tension and shear strain/stress (Katona et al, 1995;Kawarizadeh et al, 2004) together with the local volume change have been assumed as reference parameters for the mechanical regulation of functional adaptation phenomena. In spite of contributes of different authors for understanding the phenomenon, it remains quite undetermined because of the outstanding complexity and the difficulty to combine biomechanical and biochemical aspects.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…This represents a fundamental task in orthodontics because of the relationships existing between mechanical stimulus of PDL and functional adaptation of the adjacent alveolar bone. Compression, tension and shear strain/stress (Katona et al, 1995;Kawarizadeh et al, 2004) together with the local volume change have been assumed as reference parameters for the mechanical regulation of functional adaptation phenomena. In spite of contributes of different authors for understanding the phenomenon, it remains quite undetermined because of the outstanding complexity and the difficulty to combine biomechanical and biochemical aspects.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…the fibrous tissues, the fluid phase, the vasculature, the innervation and the cells within the periodontal space. However, the PDL influences also tooth long-term movement, and its strain state regulates the activity of cells in the periodontal space, that are involved in alveolar bone remodelling processes (Katona et al, 1995;Kawarizadeh et al, 2004;Roberts et al, 2004).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Information about changes of homeostasis of periodontal structures following physical stimulus is already present in literature. As proved by Katona et al in animal experiments, stress and subsequent strain induced in PDL do indeed cause bone resorption on the pressure aspect, enabling orthodontic movement but following a period of increased activity of osteoblasts in PDL [29]. This study significantly influences the treatmentconcept of periodontally compromised patients, since one may assume that increased activity of osteoblasts, triggered by orthodontic forces, may lead to regeneration of the bone defect.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 60%
“…The tooth loaded in our study was being tipped towards the bone defect with a gradually increasing level of force with each iteration. The highest stress and strain, which clinically corresponds to the highest concentration of osteoblasts [29], was found in the proximity of the alveolar process and in the central part of the periodontal defect but not at its bottom. Such characteristics resemble the model of osteoblast concentration along the root-length of the tooth being displaced under orthodontic forces [30][31][32].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 90%
“…Tooth movement produces stress/strain forces within the PDL, which are transferred to the alveolus (Tanne et al, 1987;Katona et al, 1995;Middleton et al, 1996;Puente et al, 1996;Tamatsu et al, 1996) and become transduced into a cellular response within the periodontium. In response to these forces, bone is deposited on the alveolar wall in regions of tension, and bone resorption occurs at sites experiencing pressure forces (Macapanpan et al, 1954;Waldo and Rothblatt, 1954;Zaki and Van Huysen, 1963; Azuma, 1970;Lopez Otero et al, 1973;Heller and Nanda, 1979;Yamasaki et al, 1980;Lilya et al, 1984;Martinez and Johnson, 1987; Chao et al, 1988;Lee, 1990; King et al, 1991a, b;King and Keeling, 1995; Ashizawa and Sahara, 1998).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%