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citations
Cited by 26 publications
(33 citation statements)
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References 9 publications
(12 reference statements)
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“…Strains in aponeuroses and tendon vary between 1 and 3%, which is consistent with experimental findings that were measured both during contraction and during passive stretch (Bavel et al, 1996) of rat calf muscle. During contraction, the FE simulation predicts a region with very high intramuscular pressure in the centre of the muscle, running from one to the other aponeurosis.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 76%
“…Strains in aponeuroses and tendon vary between 1 and 3%, which is consistent with experimental findings that were measured both during contraction and during passive stretch (Bavel et al, 1996) of rat calf muscle. During contraction, the FE simulation predicts a region with very high intramuscular pressure in the centre of the muscle, running from one to the other aponeurosis.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 76%
“…If a similar inhomogeneity exists in the aponeurosis of human TA in vivo, the strain of the whole aponeurosis including the end region will be somewhat larger than the results of the present study. Strain distribution along the aponeuroses has been of considerable interest in animal experiments [Trestik and Lieber, 1993;Zuurbier et al, 1994;Van Bavel et al, 1996], although knowledge on strain distribution of human aponeuroses in vivo is quite limited [Maganaris and Paul, 2000b;Muramatsu et al, 2001]. Future studies, some of which use a three-dimensional approach, will enable us to accurately describe in vivo the strain of the whole aponeurosis in humans.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This difference in ADS is likely due to the extensive aponeurosis into which the dMG fascicles insert. Because aponeurotic connective tissue is less compliant than passive muscle (Ettema and Huijing, 1989;Van Bavel et al, 1996), it has been thought to contribute to fascicle strain heterogeneity in other muscles. For example, based on cine-phase magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the distal region of the human biceps brachii was observed to undergo 3.7% shortening during a 15% maximum voluntary contraction, whereas the mid-portion of the muscle shortened 28.2% (Pappas et al, 2002).…”
Section: Functional Heterogeneity Within a Single Musclementioning
confidence: 99%