1957
DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2621.1957.tb17516.x
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Abstract: Curran and Evans (1) first reported the phenomenon of spore deactivation. This occurred when spore suspensions of a number of members of the genus Bacillus were preheated for activation and then stored under nonnutrient conditions. The result of deactivation is a marked drop in viable count during the storage period. In some cases a second preheating reactivated part or all of the apparently non-viable population. They found that spores surviving a process in whole milk and stored below growth temperature also… Show more

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Cited by 4 publications
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“…The phenomenon of autosterilization (19) or sterilization by spore deactivation (21) has been reported for flat-sour thermophiles, e.g., B. stear-otlherinophiluis. Pearce and Wheaton (19) have defined the term autosterilization as the dying out or loss of viability of spoilage spores which have never grown in the product.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 89%
“…After a relatively short storage period, decreases in counts were observed with both media at both incubation temperatures. The decreases in numbers of survivors indicate that "spore deactivation" (Schmidt and Nank, 1957) occurred during low temperature storage. This deactivation may have masked additional repair or may have been a further expression of injury.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%