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Cited by 9 publications
(9 citation statements)
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References 8 publications
(9 reference statements)
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“…This difference (on whether MR is necessary) has been indicated throughout the literature (Duxbury & Whittington 2005;Pulsford et al 2013). However, notions of 'resistance' or 'recalcitrance' are possible patient reactions (McKeown 2016).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…This difference (on whether MR is necessary) has been indicated throughout the literature (Duxbury & Whittington 2005;Pulsford et al 2013). However, notions of 'resistance' or 'recalcitrance' are possible patient reactions (McKeown 2016).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…To reduce the use and duration of MR episodes and to improve clinical practice in situations where MR is unavoidable, staff need to appreciate the value of considering possible reasons for patients’ actions and reactions (McKeown ) at the different points in the process of MR. With respect to the ‘pattern of protest’, this study underlines the need for improved staff training regarding behaviour and communication in order to avoid conflicts, engage with patients’ need(s) for dialogue about disagreements, to utilize de‐escalation strategies, and, finally, to improve communication during MR, that is with the aim of reducing the incidence of ‘overt protest reactions’. Moreover, with respect to the ‘pattern of illness’, this study underlines the necessity of information and communication during MR to support patients in being ‘genuinely calm’.…”
Section: Relevance For Clinical Practicementioning
confidence: 99%
“…Just as Douglass’ and the abolitionists’ case were not sustained on the back of moral power alone, it also required a “rebellious disposition” of the slaves themselves—in the healthcare context, nurses need to strike a more recalcitrant and rebellious pose (McKeown, ). Despite the pervasive representation of nurses as collectively passive that serves governments and employers interests in curtailing nurses’ power, there is a long history of nursing radicalism and militancy.…”
Section: Recalcitrance and Indignationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In a similar vein, scholars of public services have noted that despite the seeming omnipresence of neoliberalism, there is ample scope to do something different in the interstitial spaces of life, society and institutions, where the powerful are not always looking (Bondi , Clarke ); resonating somewhat with notions of street‐level bureaucracy (Lipsky , Wells ). Similarly, Law & Mooney () have remarked upon the virtues of recalcitrance within social movements aspiring to transformational change, and there is certainly ample scope for rebellion on the part of service users (and potential staff allies) faced with the lack of choices attendant upon compulsion and coercion into singularly biologically orientated care and treatment regimes (McKeown ; McKeown et al . forthcoming).…”
Section: Neoliberalism: the Con Is Upon Usmentioning
confidence: 99%