2006
DOI: 10.1177/107110070602700102 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: This study suggests that many patients with stage I and II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction can be effectively treated nonoperatively with an orthosis and structured exercises.

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“…The authors reported an 87 % success rate defined as not requiring further surgical treatment. Similar results have been reported by other authors assessing non-operative management of PTT insufficiency with success rates ranging from 67 %-90 % [16][17][18]. In particular, Alvarez et al [18] treated 47 consecutive patients with stage I or II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction.…”
Section: Conservative Managementsupporting
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“…The authors reported an 87 % success rate defined as not requiring further surgical treatment. Similar results have been reported by other authors assessing non-operative management of PTT insufficiency with success rates ranging from 67 %-90 % [16][17][18]. In particular, Alvarez et al [18] treated 47 consecutive patients with stage I or II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction.…”
Section: Conservative Managementsupporting
“…Similar results have been reported by other authors assessing non-operative management of PTT insufficiency with success rates ranging from 67 %-90 % [16][17][18]. In particular, Alvarez et al [18] treated 47 consecutive patients with stage I or II posterior tibial tendon dysfunction. Patients were treated in a short, articulated AFO or foot orthosis, highrepetition exercises, aggressive plantarflexion activities, and an aggressive high-repetition home exercise program that included gastrocsoleus tendon stretching.…”
Section: Conservative Managementsupporting
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“…As the heel rises, the tibialis posterior is activated and supinates the subtalar joint aligning it more directly with the ankle. This allows a more direct, straighter, and stronger pull of the tendo-Achilles across both joints [1]. The midfoot joints change from a ''loose pack'' to ''tight pack'' state preventing pathologic midfoot break.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…We propose a modification in the original classification to take this into account (Table 1) (this modification was presented at the British Orthopaedic Foot Surgery Society in 1997). Nonoperative treatment or simple decompression in refractory tenosynovitis is normally advocated in Type I TPD [1]. A variety of techniques are available to treat Stages II, III, and IV.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning