1990
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.126.12.1581
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Spindle and epithelioid cell nevus (Spitz nevus). Natural history following biopsy

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
1

Citation Types

0
8
0

Year Published

2001
2001
2013
2013

Publication Types

Select...
6
3

Relationship

0
9

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 18 publications
(8 citation statements)
references
References 0 publications
0
8
0
Order By: Relevance
“…These findings support existing theories concerning the pathogenesis of RN. Incomplete excision was implicated as the main cause for recurrence in a study of 49 cases of recurrent Spitz nevi 24 . In a study of 19 cases of RN, Schoenfeld et al 4 concluded that the junctional nevus cells originate in the epidermis adjacent to the wound and from within hair root sheaths.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These findings support existing theories concerning the pathogenesis of RN. Incomplete excision was implicated as the main cause for recurrence in a study of 49 cases of recurrent Spitz nevi 24 . In a study of 19 cases of RN, Schoenfeld et al 4 concluded that the junctional nevus cells originate in the epidermis adjacent to the wound and from within hair root sheaths.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Most importantly, however, the authors did not waste a syllable on how to distinguish those clearly malignant spitzoid tumors from ordinary Spitz nevi that are known to be benign because they practically never recur, even if excised incompletely. 49,50 Obviously, establishment of ill-defined categories with indistinct borders and failure to advance criteria for distinction of benign and malignant neoplasms is likely to contribute to overdiagnoses. By contrast, when Mones and Ackerman examined similar lesions some years ago, they advanced a list of criteria to distinguish spitzoid melanomas from Spitz nevi.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…My personal opinion is that such lesions do not need to be reexcised, remembering that most of the lesion needs to be sampled to make the determination in the first place. We know from follow-up studies that very few incompletely excised Spitz nevi persist and regrow at the biopsy site (5).…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%