2017
DOI: 10.3344/kjp.2017.30.2.93
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Abstract: The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) is a parasympathetic ganglion, located in the pterygopalatine fossa. The SPG block has been used for a long time for treating headaches of varying etiologies. For anesthesiologists, treating postdural puncture headaches (PDPH) has always been challenging. The epidural block patch (EBP) was the only option until researchers explored the role of the SPG block as a relatively simple and effective way to treat PDPH. Also, since the existing evidence proving the efficacy of the SPG… Show more

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Cited by 55 publications
(47 citation statements)
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References 14 publications
(13 reference statements)
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“…Our results demonstrate that PNBs may be an attractive option to help with pain associated with PDPH. Previous studies show similar effectiveness of these techniques in pain relief, mostly regarding SPBG in isolation 5 7 13 14. Our results also suggest that the effect is less pronounced after the second course of PNB, possibly indicating a more refractory headache.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 79%
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“…Our results demonstrate that PNBs may be an attractive option to help with pain associated with PDPH. Previous studies show similar effectiveness of these techniques in pain relief, mostly regarding SPBG in isolation 5 7 13 14. Our results also suggest that the effect is less pronounced after the second course of PNB, possibly indicating a more refractory headache.…”
Section: Discussionsupporting
confidence: 79%
“…There has been increased interest in regional analgesic techniques for treatment of PDPH, due to their success in the treatment of other headache syndromes. Several case reports and case series have been published regarding the use of peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs) for PDPH, most of which report the use of sphenopalatine ganglion block (SPGB), greater occipital nerve block (GONB) and trigger point infiltration (TPI) 5–12…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…Transnasal SPGB has been successfully used to treat chronic conditions such as migraine, cluster headache, and trigeminal neuralgia, and may be a safer alternative to treat PDPH: It is minimally invasive and carried out at the bedside without using imaging. Besides that, it has apparently a faster start than EBP, with (4) better safety prole .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Ruskin [2] reviewed the remote effects of blocking the PPG and reported its efficacy for headaches, facial neuralgias, low back pain, temporomandibular joint dysfunction, and even hiccups. Subsequently, the classic and modified techniques and related anatomy have been well documented in numerous clinical studies [3][4][5] and reviews [6,7]. Because of the anatomical complexity of the pterygopalatine fossa (PPF) and sphenopalatine foramen (SPF), depiction and clarification of the needle trajectory for PPG blockade has been challenging.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%