Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1

Citation Types

0
9
0
2

Year Published

1992
1992
2011
2011

Publication Types

Select...
3

Relationship

1
2

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 15 publications
(11 citation statements)
references
References 3 publications
0
9
0
2
Order By: Relevance
“…Speakers can use contrasts or lists in a confused way, downgrading their effectiveness, or they can enhance their effectiveness by combining formats or co-ordinating spoken oratory with suitable gestures (Atkinson, 1984a;Clayman, 1993;Grady and Potter, 1985).…”
Section: Amentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Speakers can use contrasts or lists in a confused way, downgrading their effectiveness, or they can enhance their effectiveness by combining formats or co-ordinating spoken oratory with suitable gestures (Atkinson, 1984a;Clayman, 1993;Grady and Potter, 1985).…”
Section: Amentioning
confidence: 99%
“…While existing research on the journalistic and political consequentiality of applause is highly suggestive (Atkinson, 1984a(Atkinson, : 1985Grady and Potter, 1985;Heritage and Greatbatch, 1986), much remains unknown. This is as it should be; it is appropriate that the description and analysis of speaker-audience interaction have developed in advance of research on effects.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 98%
“…Recently, however, researchers have begun to examine how audiences interact with speakers by producing collective responses such as applause (Atkinson, 1984a(Atkinson, , 1984b(Atkinson, , 1985(Atkinson, , 1986Brodine, 1986;Grady and Potter, 1985;Heritage and Greatbatch, 1986;Keith and Whittenberger-Keith, 1988/9). While these interactive moments may seem rather distant from the traditional concerns of rhetoric and public communication, their analysis can yield novel insights into the production and reception of public speech.…”
Section: The Study Of Speaker-audience Interactionsmentioning
confidence: 98%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…In most cases, the speakers then confirm the relevance of applause by ceding the floor until audiences' responses end or begin to subside (Atkinson, 1984a). Atkinson (1984a, b) and Heritage and Greatbatch (1986) identify seven rhetorical devices (contrasts, lists, puzzle-solution, headline-punchline, combinations, position taking and pursuits) through which speakers elicit applause from their audiences (see also Brodine, 1986;Clayman, 1993;Grady & Potter, 1985;McIlvenny, 1996). These devices can be used by public speakers to facilitate applause by emphasizing messages and by providing clearly projectable message completion points around which individual audience members can coordinate their actions.…”
Section: Speaker-audience Interactionmentioning
confidence: 97%