2010
DOI: 10.1080/09500693.2010.492253 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: This paper is part of an extensive study of secondary school students' preconceived ideas about climate change. Here, we undertake a survey in the province of Valencia (Spain) to ascertain secondary school students' notions of the causes and consequences of climate change. Results show, among other things, that students clearly relate the misuse of motor vehicles and factory emissions to the problem. However, the obvious correlation with household energy use is not observed. The usual confusion with other envi… Show more

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“…Somewhat similar findings and ordering for some of these items have been reported previously, although there are variations in levels of support and occasional discrepancies to what was found in this study (cf. Boon, ; Liarakou et al., ; Punter et al., ; Schreiner et al., ; Shepardson et al., ). Table also shows that more females than males believed in the usefulness of four actions, whereas the effect of age/grade was found for six actions (increasing NSW numbers for higher grades for two actions; decreasing English numbers for four).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
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“…Somewhat similar findings and ordering for some of these items have been reported previously, although there are variations in levels of support and occasional discrepancies to what was found in this study (cf. Boon, ; Liarakou et al., ; Punter et al., ; Schreiner et al., ; Shepardson et al., ). Table also shows that more females than males believed in the usefulness of four actions, whereas the effect of age/grade was found for six actions (increasing NSW numbers for higher grades for two actions; decreasing English numbers for four).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
“…It was assumed that expressed beliefs are, in part, dependent upon students' understanding of the science underpinning enhanced global warming and, as outlined above, intended willingness to act is probably, to some extent, dependent on these beliefs. Although not detailed here, several relatively recent reports of European and North American secondary students' understanding of global warming have described findings relevant to the research in this paper: These findings show, for example, that there is considerable variation in levels of awareness about GHGs (apart from carbon dioxide), their origins, and impacts; that the impact of nuclear power on global warming may be misunderstood; that knowledge of renewable energy sources can be limited; the Kyoto protocol may not be associated with GHGs; and that some students may not appreciate that individual actions can influence global warming (Hansen, 2010;Liarakou, Athanasiadis, & Gavrilakis, 2011;Punter, Ochando-Pardo, & Garcia, 2011;Schreiner et al, 2005;Shepardson et al, 2009). Such findings, however, are not necessarily directly transferable to the NSW and English situations; context is always a consideration.…”
Section: Secondary Students' Beliefs About Actions To Reduce Global Wmentioning
“…In addition, the misconceptions detected reflected to a great extent common confusions indicated in the international literature. Such include the confusion of the greenhouse effect with ozone layer depletion (Hansen, 2010;Lee, Lester, Ma, Lambert, & Jean-Baptiste, 2007;Ö sterlind, 2005;Rebich & Gautier, 2005), the types and properties of greenhouse gases and the misunderstanding of the source, type and nature of the heat that is trapped (Boon, 2010;Gautier, Deutsch, & Rebich, 2006;Hansen, 2010;Mower, 2012;Ö sterlind, 2005;Punter, Ochando-Pardo, & Garcia, 2011;Rebich & Gautier, 2005;Shepardson, Niyogi, Choi, & Charusombat, 2009). Confusions as to effects and management of the phenomenon are also prevalent.…”
Section: Misconceptions and Climate Changementioning
“…Confusions as to effects and management of the phenomenon are also prevalent. For instance, climate change is commonly perceived as related to certain environmental issues such as lead pollution, radioactive contamination and acid precipitation (Mower, 2012;Papadimitriou, 2004;Punter et al, 2011).…”
Section: Misconceptions and Climate Changementioning
“…Uno de estos enfoques, en el cual se enmarca esta investigación, aborda el tratamiento del CC en contextos educativos, explorando los conocimientos de estudiantes y docentes de todos los niveles (KHALID, 2001;PAPADIMITRIOU, 2004;KI-LINÇ;STANISSTREET;BOYES, 2008;ARTO-BLANCO, 2010;GONZÁLEZ--GAUDIANO;MALDONADO-GONZÁLEZ, 2013). Los resultados obtenidos han servido para elaborar propuestas didácticas que ayuden a que estos colectivos desarrollen una mejor comprensión del problema (SHEPARDSON et al, 2011;PUNTER;OCHANDO-PARDO;GARCÍA, 2010).…”
Section: Introductionunclassified