2008
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.144.6.820
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Sorafenib-Induced Eruptive Melanocytic Lesions

Abstract: We report 2 cases of eruptive melanocytic lesions associated with sorafenib, a multikinase inhibitor FDA-approved for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Understanding the development of this previously unknown side effect may provide further insight into sorafenib's mechanistic effects on tumors and normal tissues and into the development of pigmented lesions. Report of Cases Case 1 A 60-year-old black female with metastatic renal cell carcinoma received sorafenib 400 mg orally twice daily. After … Show more

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Cited by 71 publications
(42 citation statements)
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“…In some patients, tumor shrinkage appears to be less effective than expected [35] . In addition, a growing number of publications have reported complications associated with sorafenib treatment [36] . The occurrence of these adverse events may be prevented if the dosage of sorafenib required for effective treatment can be reduced.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In some patients, tumor shrinkage appears to be less effective than expected [35] . In addition, a growing number of publications have reported complications associated with sorafenib treatment [36] . The occurrence of these adverse events may be prevented if the dosage of sorafenib required for effective treatment can be reduced.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Moreover, some of patients benefit from treatments with drugs targeting the EGFR or the VEGFR pathways (Llovet et al, 2008;Chan et al, 2010;Brady-West and McGrowder, 2011). Thus, EGFR and VEGFR pathways are a promising therapeutic target for many cancer types (Kong et al, 2008). Viale et al (2009) reported that disease-free survival (DFS) overall survival (OS) rates worsened in patients with TNBC having EGFR expression when compared to those with tumors without EGFR expression (Viale et al, 2009).…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Upon restoration of full-dose sorafenib, HFSR recurred in only one of those patients. No sorafenib-induced nevi modifications were observed; however, since this study, several nevi eruptions have occurred in patients treated with sorafenib [32,33]. In a single case study of a patient with RCC who presented with HFSR after treatment with sorafenib, discontinuation of treatment for 14 days combined with topical treatment and mild analgesics for pain led to resolution of the HFSR [34].…”
Section: Gradementioning
confidence: 86%