2007
DOI: 10.1007/s12124-007-9015-x
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Abstract: In this paper I suggest that to better understand knowledge construction in science, and the role of social processes and collaboration in it, it is useful to distinguish between "elaborative knowledge" and "emergent knowledge." Elaborative knowledge is constructed for solving clearly defined problems in established theoretical frameworks, and emergent knowledge refers to the knowledge constructed to reach a hierarchically higher and more complex level of scientific understanding. There are also two types of c… Show more

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Cited by 15 publications
(16 citation statements)
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References 52 publications
(51 reference statements)
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“…Stokols and colleagues, 14 who were proponents of interdisciplinary training, pointed out that critics have suggested that the relative value of collaborative research to science and society has been overstated and that perhaps collaborative research is just a fad. In fact, Toomela 22 noted that collaboration does not always lead to increased productivity or greater efficiency. Collaborative research draws investigators away from their discipline‐based research, in which they may actually be more productive working independently than in collaboration.…”
Section: Factors To Stimulate Collaborative Researchmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Thus, psychology's-not only cultural psychology's-core conceptual problem is not merely 'dualisms' of all kinds, but understanding of the dualities (or multiplicities) inherent in what seems to be a unitary point-to which a number can be easily assigned (Wagoner & Valsiner, 2005; see also Valsiner, 2004a, p. 11). The issue of treating the science of psychology as an act of assigning numbers to qualitative phenomena (to get data) has been discussed critically by Rudolph (2006aRudolph ( , 2006bRudolph ( , 2006c as well as Toomela (2007bToomela ( , 2008a. The social consensus of number assignment guarantees no science-hence many of psychology's data-analytic practices are the kind of cultural artifacts that may belong to a museum, rather than contribute to advancement of knowledge.…”
Section: Unity Of Quality and Quantity-yet No Equality Of The Twomentioning
confidence: 99%
“…First efforts in that direction are notable (Marková & Plichtova, 2007;Pontecorvo, 2007;Toomela, 2007b). International collaboration brings about a new form of sudden contact (Moghaddam, 2006b) between psychologists.…”
Section: New Field For Inquiry: Cultural Psychology Of the Social Scimentioning
confidence: 99%
“…As psychology is globalizing the questions of collaborative research have been of importance (Akkerman et al 2006;Arcidiacono 2007;Marková and Plichtová 2007;Pontecorvo 2007;Zittoun et al 2007). International collaboration brings with it both the richness of varied understandings-ready to fertilize the theories-and the adaptation needs of researchers to one another's expectations for collective inquiry (Toomela 2007b). Increasing move towards institutional authorship of research results (Valsiner 2009b) and the role of immediate "impacts" changes the lives of contemporary researchers.…”
Section: The Nature Of Evidence: Data As Framed By Ideologiesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Previous studies have shown that patterns of collaboration vary by academic discipline (Clarke, 1964;Meadows, 1974;Hargens, 1975;Frame and Carpenter, 1979;Stefaniak, 1982;Avkiran, 1997;Garg and Padhi, 2001;Liang et al, 2001;Wagner-Döbler, 2001;Moody, 2004;Gulbrandsen and Smeby, 2005;Toomela, 2007). The culture, norms, and practices native to disciplines would thus be controlled to isolate their influence.…”
Section: Independent Variablesmentioning
confidence: 99%