2020
DOI: 10.1590/1806-9282.66.1.87
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Solid pseudopapillary neoplasia of the pancreas: a review

Abstract: SUMMARY OBJECTIVES To review the literature and the diagnosis of conventional histopathological routine and immunohistochemistry of the cases diagnosed with Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas (SPNP). METHODS The review of the literature was done using the Pubmed and solid Google-Scholar databases, through the historical, clinical aspects and diagnostic methods of SPNP. The review of SPNP cases diagnosed in the University Hospital Clementino Fraga Filho was carried out from 1977 to 2018. RESULT… Show more

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Cited by 6 publications
(2 citation statements)
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“…As a result, 90% of SPNPs have an abnormal pattern of nuclear marking of the protein β-catenin, whereas in a healthy pancreas, the marking is on the membrane. B-catenin interacts with E-cadherin, so the deregulation of the former interferes with the expression of the latter and, consequently, no membrane expression of E-cadherin is observed in most SPNP [ 14 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…As a result, 90% of SPNPs have an abnormal pattern of nuclear marking of the protein β-catenin, whereas in a healthy pancreas, the marking is on the membrane. B-catenin interacts with E-cadherin, so the deregulation of the former interferes with the expression of the latter and, consequently, no membrane expression of E-cadherin is observed in most SPNP [ 14 ].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…These types have unique paths during development and progression to invasive tumors[ 25 ], and specific genetic alterations observed in IPMNs may be responsible for tumor phenotypes and ultimately influence the patients’ outcome[ 26 , 27 ]. In most cases, other pancreatic lesions with cystic features, such as solid cystic neoplasm (SCN)[ 28 , 29 ], mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN)[ 30 ], and solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN)[ 28 ], can be easily distinguished from classic PDA[ 31 ]; however, atypical imaging findings of patients occasionally impair proper diagnosis. Knowledge and use of relevant genetic alterations unique to these cystic neoplasms may aid patients and physicians in making appropriate decisions.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%