2007
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.143.3.428
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Sock-Line Hyperpigmentation: Case Series and Literature Review

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Cited by 18 publications
(26 citation statements)
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References 5 publications
(6 reference statements)
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“…751,752 This condition must be distinguished from macular amyloidosis, which clinically it resembles. 755,756 It has also been likened to amniotic bands of infancy. In some countries the use of a scrub pad (loofah) has been implicated.…”
Section: Frictional Melanosismentioning
confidence: 99%
“…751,752 This condition must be distinguished from macular amyloidosis, which clinically it resembles. 755,756 It has also been likened to amniotic bands of infancy. In some countries the use of a scrub pad (loofah) has been implicated.…”
Section: Frictional Melanosismentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The exact cause of sock‐line bands is unknown but is felt to represent preceding trauma from tight clothing, primarily socks or tights. Histopathology of these eruptions is nonspecific but shows dermal inflammation, melanocytic hyperplasia, and basal layer hyperpigmentation, likely post‐inflammatory in nature …”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…After 2 weeks without sock use, the lesion faded to brown hyperpigmentation (b), and it completely resolved during a 3‐month follow‐up period. Heel‐ or sock‐line bands represent a rare skin condition characterized by linear, unilateral or bilateral, circumferential lesions developed in an infant after wearing tight garments . Dermal inflammation or panniculitis related to local pressure and the vulnerability of infantile skin may lead to postinflammatory changes.…”
mentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Dermal inflammation or panniculitis related to local pressure and the vulnerability of infantile skin may lead to postinflammatory changes. This benign condition typically resolves within a few months and does not require further treatment …”
mentioning
confidence: 99%