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“…Distinct characteristics of ingroup favoritism, in contrast to outgroup hostility, have been revealed in a number of previous studies including in the use of economic games (De Dreu, 2010;Halevy, Bornstein & Sagiv, 2008;Weisel & Böhm, 2015;Yamagishi & Mifune, 2009). Halevy et al (2008), for example, reported that pre-game communication with ingroup members increased intragroup cooperation but did not affect intergroup competition, suggesting participants were motivated to help the ingroup rather than harm the outgroup.…”
Section: Favoritism Hostility and Multiculturalismmentioning
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rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“…Distinct characteristics of ingroup favoritism, in contrast to outgroup hostility, have been revealed in a number of previous studies including in the use of economic games (De Dreu, 2010;Halevy, Bornstein & Sagiv, 2008;Weisel & Böhm, 2015;Yamagishi & Mifune, 2009). Halevy et al (2008), for example, reported that pre-game communication with ingroup members increased intragroup cooperation but did not affect intergroup competition, suggesting participants were motivated to help the ingroup rather than harm the outgroup.…”
Section: Favoritism Hostility and Multiculturalismmentioning
“…We sought to better understand what sorts of environmental cues might alter testosterone changes when men interact. Many findings related to intergroup relationships suggest that when men interact with dissimilar out-groups, there should be more conflict than with interactions among similar persons (see Yamagishi and Mifune, 2009 for a recent example) and, thus, might lead to the prediction that there will be more attempts to gain status when interacting with dissimilar others, and perhaps concomitant increases in testosterone. However, this was not our prediction.…”
Section: Baseline and Change Are Not The Samementioning
“…To overcome such social dilemmas requires strategies to cooperate with each other, and the evidence suggests that this has produced a suite of male coalitional adaptations, including male bonding and male-to-male cooperation. For example, men display increased levels of cooperation during inter-group competition (Van Vugt, De Cremer, & Janssen, 2007;Yuki & Yakota, 2009), show greater amounts of ingroup favoritism in same-sex groups (Yamagishi & Mifune, 2009), have greater levels of cooperation in same-sex dyads (Rapoport & Chammah, 1965), and tend to be more accommodating during interpersonal conflict Eckel & Grossman, 1996). In contrast, there were no specific pressures on ancestral women to provide these highly salient public goods and the physical risks involved in contributing to hunting and warfare selected against women's participation in such tasks.…”
Section: Cooperation In Same-sex Interactionsmentioning