1962
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.1962.01590010071009
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Skin Problems of the Leg Amputee

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Cited by 35 publications
(30 citation statements)
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“…Skin care of the residual limb is of great importance in that any skin irritation could endanger load bearing and prosthesis use in spite of appropriate socket fit [15,[19][20]. Skin problems that could easily be seen in people with amputation include those with mechanical sources (epidermoid, cysts, calluses, verrucous hyperplasia), allergic reactions (inflammation, eczema, contact dermatitis, rash), and fungal or bacterial infections [14,21].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Skin care of the residual limb is of great importance in that any skin irritation could endanger load bearing and prosthesis use in spite of appropriate socket fit [15,[19][20]. Skin problems that could easily be seen in people with amputation include those with mechanical sources (epidermoid, cysts, calluses, verrucous hyperplasia), allergic reactions (inflammation, eczema, contact dermatitis, rash), and fungal or bacterial infections [14,21].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…It is not uncommon for amputees to develop skin problems on the residual limb, such as blisters, cysts, edema, dermatitis, etc. (7,8,9).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Forces and moments are transferred from the prosthesis through the interface of the socket with the tissues and skin of the residuum, often resulting in discomfort, pain, and secondary trauma [1]. To eliminate the negative outcomes of the socket-type attachment, Dr. Per-Ingvar Brånemark and his colleagues introduced direct attachment of prostheses to the residuum [2][3].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The latter is illustrated in Figure 1, in which F 1 and F 2 are the minimal forces needed for detachment of a skin cell from the pylon with the traditional "cell-to-wall" and the new "cell-to-wall-to-inner cell" attachments, respectively. If a natural bond is permitted between the cells outside and inside the pylon through a pore in the pylon wall, an additional "cell-to-cell" attachment (adhesion) force contributes to the resistance to the cell's detachment, resulting in F 2 being greater than F 1 .…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%