2014
DOI: 10.1590/1678-476620141043299307
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Abstract: ABSTRACT. Amphisbaena nigricauda Gans, 1966 is a small, poorly known amphisbaenid endemic to the restinga of the states of Espírito Santo and Bahia, Brazil. We analyze 178 specimens collected in Vitória municipality, state of Espírito Santo, Brazil, to investigate whether this species show sexual dimorphism in pre-cloacal pores and in morphological characters. Sex was determined by a ventral incision and direct inspection of gonads. A PCA analysis was performed to generate a general body size measurement. A T … Show more

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Cited by 8 publications
(4 citation statements)
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References 21 publications
(9 reference statements)
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“…We found no evidence of sexual dimorphism in C. leucura, either during ontogeny or among adults. Whether this reflects the absence of sexual selection pressures (e.g., competition for mates, female fecundity) in this and other species is still unknown, since reproductive behavior of amphisbaenians has rarely been observed (Souza e Lima et al, 2014;but see Cooper et al, 1994, Filogonio et al, 2009.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 94%
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“…We found no evidence of sexual dimorphism in C. leucura, either during ontogeny or among adults. Whether this reflects the absence of sexual selection pressures (e.g., competition for mates, female fecundity) in this and other species is still unknown, since reproductive behavior of amphisbaenians has rarely been observed (Souza e Lima et al, 2014;but see Cooper et al, 1994, Filogonio et al, 2009.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 94%
“…In addition to body length, head shape is one of the most consistently dimorphic traits in lizards (Olsson et al, ), with larger male heads associated with enhanced success in male‐male competition (Vitt and Cooper, ; Anderson and Vitt, ) and increased bite force and prey handling efficiency (Verwaijen et al, ). Evidence of sexual dimorphism in amphisbaenians is mixed: males can be larger than females ( Amphisbaena nigricaudata , Souza e Lima et al, ; Leposternon polystegum , Gomes et al, ), females can be larger than males ( Anops kingii , Vega, ; Zygaspis quadrifrons , Webb et al, ), sexes can have similar body lengths but larger heads in one (males in Trogonophis wiegmanni , Martín et al, ; Blanus cinereus , Gil et al, ; Leposternon microcephalum and L. wuchereri , Filogonio et al, ; and females in Monopeltis anchietae , Webb et al, ), or sexes can be the same in both body length and head size ( Bipes biporus , Kearney, ; Amphisbaena ibijara , Gomes et al, ). We found no evidence of sexual dimorphism in C. leucura , either during ontogeny or among adults.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Despite the lack of empirical evidence of male–male competition in amphisbaenians, experiments show that males respond aggressively to scents of conspecific males (López & Martín, 2009; Martín et al, 2020). Thus, sexually dimorphic species where males are larger than females (e.g., Gomes et al 2009; Souza e Lima et al 2014) could indicate male–male competition, ultimately leading to tail breakage. There is no sexual dimorphism in Amphisbaena vermicularis , and we found no sexual differences in the frequency of urotomy between sexes, which suggests that tail loss does not involve differential survival between males and females (Costa et al., 2014).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The testes are typically ovoid in lizards and elongated in snakes (Gribbins & Rheubert, ; Lombardi, ). In general, lizards and snakes have paired testes with asymmetric placement in the way that the right testis is anterior to the left one (Fox, ; Gans & Parsons, ; Gribbins & Rheubert, ; Mott, Rodrigues, & de Freitas, ; Navega‐Gonçalves, ; Rheubert et al, ; Sever, ; Siegel, Sever, Rheubert, & Gribbins, ), while Amphisbaena nigricauda reveals intraspecific variation in the testis disposition, with 86%, 4% and 10% of the male population showing the more anterior right testis, the more anterior left testis and the symmetrically positioned testes, respectively (de Souza e Lima, Gasparini, de Padua Almeida, Vital, & Mott, ). However, L. ocellata have comparably sized, almost symmetrically disposed, bilateral testes.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%