2016
DOI: 10.1590/1678-457x.0032 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
|

Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate the physical quality and sensory acceptance of gluten-free breads with different percentages of chia flour (Salvia Hispanica L.). The chia flour was used to substitute rice flour and soy flour in order to replace the gum required in this type of bread. Four formulations were developed; a standard made with gum, and three formulations with 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5% of chia flour. Analyses of specific volume, cooking losses and the rise in dough of the breads were performed. Senso… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance
Select...
2
1
1
0
11
0

Year Published

2017
2017
2019
2019

Publication Types

Select...
4

Relationship

0
4

Authors

Journals

0
11
0
Order By: Relevance
“…On the other hand, Burgos and Armada () demonstrated amaranth suitability to precooked products due its high expansion and yellow index. Chia flour was incorporated at different levels in cakes (25%, 50%, and 75%) (Borneo and others ), corn tortillas (5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%) (Rendón‐Villalobos and others ), and gluten‐free bread (from 4% to 15%) (Moreira and others ; Steffolani and others ; Da Mota Huerta and others ). Chia flour played the role of hydrocolloid, indeed, because it significantly increased the water‐holding capacity of the dough (Olivos‐Lugo and others ; Steffolani and others ; Da Mota Huerta and others ).…”
Section: Ancient Grains‐based Foodstuffs: Nutritional Added Value Andmentioning
Create an account to read the remaining citation statements from this report. You will also get access to:
  • Search over 1.2b+ citation statments to see what is being said about any topic in the research literature
  • Advanced Search to find publications that support or contrast your research
  • Citation reports and visualizations to easily see what publications are saying about each other
  • Browser extension to see Smart Citations wherever you read research
  • Dashboards to evaluate and keep track of groups of publications
  • Alerts to stay on top of citations as they happen
  • Automated reference checks to make sure you are citing reliable research in your manuscripts
  • 14 day free preview of our premium features.

Trusted by researchers and organizations around the world

Over 130,000 students researchers, and industry experts at use scite

See what students are saying

rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“…On the other hand, Burgos and Armada () demonstrated amaranth suitability to precooked products due its high expansion and yellow index. Chia flour was incorporated at different levels in cakes (25%, 50%, and 75%) (Borneo and others ), corn tortillas (5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%) (Rendón‐Villalobos and others ), and gluten‐free bread (from 4% to 15%) (Moreira and others ; Steffolani and others ; Da Mota Huerta and others ). Chia flour played the role of hydrocolloid, indeed, because it significantly increased the water‐holding capacity of the dough (Olivos‐Lugo and others ; Steffolani and others ; Da Mota Huerta and others ).…”
Section: Ancient Grains‐based Foodstuffs: Nutritional Added Value Andmentioning
“…Steffolani, de la Hera, Perez, and Gomez () observed that the replacement of rice flour with 15% WCF or 15% chia seeds darkened the GFB, reduced the specific volume, and increased the hardness, but it does not reduce the overall acceptability (for scores of approximately 5 ‐ neither like nor dislike, on a 9‐point hedonic scale). Huerta, Alves, Silva, Kubota, and Rosa () replaced rice and soy flour with 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5% WCF, and they observed that bread with 2.5% WCF showed no significant differences in relation to the control for the specific volume and baking loss as well as for the color, aroma, taste, texture, and appearance acceptability (scores ranging from 4.5 to 5.5, on a 7‐point hedonic scale).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…Similarly, other authors investigating chia seed supplementation did not report deterioration of the sensory qualities of the analyzed bread types. Huerta et al () demonstrated that replacement of soybean and rice flour with 2.5% of chia seeds yielded gluten‐free bread with sensory traits similar to those of the control bread. In turn, Iglesias‐Puig and Haros () reported that the addition of chia seeds to cereal products enhanced overall consumer acceptability.…”
Section: Resultsmentioning
“…Chia seeds have been used in bakery products (Bustos et al, 2017;Costantini et al, 2014;Farrera-Rebollo et al, 2012;Huerta, Alves, Silva, da Kubota, & Rosa, 2016), but there is no information available about the use of a by-product of chia oil extraction. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the addition of chia waste on the quality of wheat and gluten-free breads and to compare the effects of adding the waste with the effects of adding whole seeds.…”
mentioning