2017
DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.00321 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
|

Abstract: Prior research differentiates dialectical (e.g., East Asian) from non-dialectical cultures (e.g., North American and Latino) and attributes cultural differences in self-concept consistency to naïve dialecticism. In this research, we explored the effects of managing two cultural identities on consistency within the bicultural self-concept via the role of dialectical beliefs. Because the challenge of integrating more than one culture within the self is common to biculturals of various heritage backgrounds, the e… Show more

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance
Select...
2
1
1
1
2
14
0

Year Published

2018
2018
2021
2021

Publication Types

Select...
3

Relationship

1
2

Authors

Journals

2
14
0
Order By: Relevance
“…Situated within biculturalism research, the findings of these studies add to a growing body of work examining the unique products of the common processes biculturals use to negotiate their cultures (Tadmor et al, 2012; Saad et al, 2013; Zhang et al, 2017). As advocates of a transformative theory of biculturalism, we have elsewhere encouraged researchers to find the ways that biculturals are more than the sum of their parts (West et al, 2017); how do the specific ways biculturals negotiate their cultures affect their experiences and characteristics, beyond the effects of each of their cultures independently?…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
See 1 more Smart Citation
Create an account to read the remaining citation statements from this report. You will also get access to:
  • Search over 1b+ citation statments to see what is being said about any topic in the research literature
  • Advanced Search to find publications that support or contrast your research
  • Citation reports and visualizations to easily see what publications are saying about each other
  • Browser extension to see Smart Citations wherever you read research
  • Dashboards to evaluate and keep track of groups of publications
  • Alerts to stay on top of citations as they happen
  • Automated reference checks to make sure you are citing reliable research in your manuscripts
  • 14 day free preview of our premium features.

Trusted by researchers and organizations around the world

Over 100,000 students researchers, and industry experts at use scite

See what students are saying

rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“…Situated within biculturalism research, the findings of these studies add to a growing body of work examining the unique products of the common processes biculturals use to negotiate their cultures (Tadmor et al, 2012; Saad et al, 2013; Zhang et al, 2017). As advocates of a transformative theory of biculturalism, we have elsewhere encouraged researchers to find the ways that biculturals are more than the sum of their parts (West et al, 2017); how do the specific ways biculturals negotiate their cultures affect their experiences and characteristics, beyond the effects of each of their cultures independently?…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…An overarching goal guiding our research is to understand the shared experiences of biculturals who may negotiate their cultures in similar ways despite the diversity of their specific backgrounds (West et al, 2017; Zhang et al, 2017). Thus, the present research is designed to capture the frame switching experiences of a diverse population of biculturals in a shared Western context.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…How does identity abstraction play into the likelihood of identity fusion, and vice versa? Might identity fusion be detrimental to well‐being in cultures that normalize “balance” through dialectic beliefs (e.g., yin and yang; Wang et al., 2020; Zhang et al., 2017; see also uncertainty avoidance; Hofstede, 2001). What role does depth of social category knowledge play in facilitating or hindering identity fusion?…”
Section: Identity Processes: Key Mechanisms Of Identity Changementioning
“…SIC theory (Roccas and Brewer, 2002) posits that the reconciliation process may cause psychological dissonance, and the result depends on whether individuals are aware of the identity differences and the methods by which to integrate them. High-SIC individuals can recognize and/or reconcile the inconsistencies among identities through high open-mindedness (Hong, 2010) by emphasizing overall value priorities (Roccas and Brewer, 2002) and by developing dialectical self-beliefs (Zhang et al, 2017). Dual-identity holders are those who are able to construct perceptions of different communities such that potentially competing and inconsistent definitions of the social self are reconciled.…”
Section: Dual-identity Holdersmentioning
“…We call this group of migrant workers dual-identity holders. These works in the literature have been found to perceive fewer threats to their self-concept, higher interpersonal tolerance, and higher dialectical self-belief (Roccas and Brewer, 2002;Huff et al, 2017;Zhang et al, 2017). However, with few studies having examined migrant workers' feelings about the workplace, we aim to explore whether dual-identity holders perceive higher or lower emotional exhaustion in the workplace and seek to understand the mechanisms.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning