2011
DOI: 10.5194/bgd-8-12317-2011 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Seasonal changes in nitrogen (N) pools, carbon (C) content and natural abundance of 13C and 15N in different tissues of ryegrass plants were investigated in two intensively managed grassland fields in order to address their ammonia (NH3) exchange potential. Green leaves generally had the largest total N concentration followed by stems and inflorescences. Senescent leaves had the lowest N concentration, indicating N re-allocation. The seasonal pattern of the Γ value, i.e. … Show more

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“…For the timing of tissue growth to be the cause of the offset would require seasonal changes in the dietary isotopic composition, either through changes in the isotopic signature of the plants or through changes in dietary selection. Plant δ 13 C and δ 15 N values have been shown to vary seasonally due to seasonal climatic variations; [33,64,[71][72][73][74] however, we do not have vegetation isotopic data to show whether or not this occurs on the Isle of Rum. A study in eastern Scotland showed no significant correlation of plant carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios with accumulated monthly precipitation, save for a weak positive relation for the δ 13 C values of senescent leaves, while the carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios of green leaves, stems and senescent leaves were correlated with mean monthly temperature (negatively for δ 15 N values, positively for δ 13 C values) with a high degree of variability; [74] however, this study was on intensively managed grassland, fertilised with mineral nitrogen throughout the growing season, so is not directly comparable with our study site.…”
Section: Bone-antler Comparisonmentioning
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rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“…For the timing of tissue growth to be the cause of the offset would require seasonal changes in the dietary isotopic composition, either through changes in the isotopic signature of the plants or through changes in dietary selection. Plant δ 13 C and δ 15 N values have been shown to vary seasonally due to seasonal climatic variations; [33,64,[71][72][73][74] however, we do not have vegetation isotopic data to show whether or not this occurs on the Isle of Rum. A study in eastern Scotland showed no significant correlation of plant carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios with accumulated monthly precipitation, save for a weak positive relation for the δ 13 C values of senescent leaves, while the carbon and nitrogen isotopic ratios of green leaves, stems and senescent leaves were correlated with mean monthly temperature (negatively for δ 15 N values, positively for δ 13 C values) with a high degree of variability; [74] however, this study was on intensively managed grassland, fertilised with mineral nitrogen throughout the growing season, so is not directly comparable with our study site.…”
Section: Bone-antler Comparisonmentioning
“…Elaborating quality forage production curves, which represent protein, fiber, and energy in the forage, is critical to define the nutritional value of pastures and build balanced diets for grazing animals (Owens et al, 2008). In temperate zones, production and protein ratio in pastures have a seasonal change, whose size and trends is needed to know to develop efficient and productive farming systems (Wang and Schjoerring, 2012).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…The management of the crops can heavily influence the loss of NH 3 to the atmosphere. However, little is known about these processes and only few studies of N-exchange between atmosphere and vegetation cover the entire season exploring the full cycle of growth and decay (Wang and Schjørring, 2012). Several mechanistic descriptions of the compensation point have been derived (Massad et al, 2010a;WichinkKruit et al, 2012) and these rely strongly on detailed information on agricultural production methods which for several decades have been difficult to obtain and generalise (Hutchings et al, 2001;Skjøth et al, 2011).…”
Section: Other Agricultural Sources Including Plantsmentioning