2005
DOI: 10.1590/s1517-83822005000300007 View full text |Buy / Rent full text
|
|

Abstract: Aspergillus sp. NR46F13, isolated from soil via sinigrin-barium sulphate agar technique, was tested for myrosinase production. The fungus degraded glucosinate and produced 3.19 U mL -1 of myrosinase after 48h cultivation. due to the high myrosinase production, this new isolate is a potential candidate for industrial applications.

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance
Select...
2
1
1
1
1
8
1
1

Year Published

2008
2008
2020
2020

Publication Types

Select...
4

Relationship

0
4

Authors

Journals

1
8
1
1
Order By: Relevance
“…2). Myrosinase activity in soil is probably due to production of myrosinase by microorganisms, and soil fungi have been shown to produce myrosinase (Sakorn et al 2002;Rakariyatham et al 2005). Three studies have shown that there is myrosinase activity in soil and soil extracts (Borek et al 1996;Al-Turki and Dick 2003;).…”
Section: Glucosinolate Hydrolysis In Soilmentioning
Create an account to read the remaining citation statements from this report. You will also get access to:
  • Search over 1.2b+ citation statments to see what is being said about any topic in the research literature
  • Advanced Search to find publications that support or contrast your research
  • Citation reports and visualizations to easily see what publications are saying about each other
  • Browser extension to see Smart Citations wherever you read research
  • Dashboards to evaluate and keep track of groups of publications
  • Alerts to stay on top of citations as they happen
  • Automated reference checks to make sure you are citing reliable research in your manuscripts
  • 14 day free preview of our premium features.

Trusted by researchers and organizations around the world

Over 130,000 students researchers, and industry experts at use scite

See what students are saying

rupbmjkragerfmgwileyiopcupepmcmbcthiemesagefrontiersapsiucrarxivemeralduhksmucshluniversity-of-gavle
“…2). Myrosinase activity in soil is probably due to production of myrosinase by microorganisms, and soil fungi have been shown to produce myrosinase (Sakorn et al 2002;Rakariyatham et al 2005). Three studies have shown that there is myrosinase activity in soil and soil extracts (Borek et al 1996;Al-Turki and Dick 2003;).…”
Section: Glucosinolate Hydrolysis In Soilmentioning
“…However, studies on glucosinolate degradation with solid state fermentation is also prevalent due to both low energy requirements for downstream processing and low operating costs needed for effluent treatment. Since fermentation technology generally decreases glucosinolates content to zero at a set level regardless of liquid or solid state fermentation, it has been applied to degrade glucosinolates for decades Bau et al 1994;Sakorn et al 1999;Smits et al 1993;Rakariyatham et al 2006;Rakariyatham et al 2005;Butrindr et al 2004;Palop et al 1995).…”
Section: Re-screeningmentioning
“…NR4617E1 and NR4617MG3 degraded 10 mM glucosinolates in 36 h (Rakariyatham et al 2006). Rakariyatham et al (2005) isolated 28 strains from soil and Aspergillus sp. NR463, Aspergillus sp.…”
Section: Strain Combinationmentioning
“…In these structures, the glycoside is bridged to the aglycon moiety by a sulphur bond. The breakdown of S-glycosidic bonds in glucosinolates (GSL) can release molecules with activity against pests and herbivores (part of the plant defence mechanism) and isothiocyanate, a chemoprotective agent linked to the prevention of cancers (Dufour et al 2015;Halkier and Gershenzon 2006;Rakariyatham et al 2005 ;Samec et al 2016;Winde and Wittstock 2011).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning