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Cited by 750 publications
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References 45 publications
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“…Indeed, there continues to be recognition that, as discussed in the background section, clinical characteristics and statistical decisions both influence the selection of most appropriate cut-off [14]. We also acknowledge that there is greater uncertainty associated with the use of the clinical cut-offs for the two instruments as a screen for caseness in comparison with their use for diagnostic purposes [4951]. It will be interesting in future studies to examine this issue also with respect to the Deaf population and the cut-offs now established for the instruments in BSL.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Indeed, there continues to be recognition that, as discussed in the background section, clinical characteristics and statistical decisions both influence the selection of most appropriate cut-off [14]. We also acknowledge that there is greater uncertainty associated with the use of the clinical cut-offs for the two instruments as a screen for caseness in comparison with their use for diagnostic purposes [4951]. It will be interesting in future studies to examine this issue also with respect to the Deaf population and the cut-offs now established for the instruments in BSL.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The PHQ-9 and the GAD-7 will be used to assess depression [42] and anxiety [43, 44]. All items are scored on a 4-point Likert scale (0 = not at all, 1 = several days; 2 = more than half of the days; 3 = nearly all days).…”
Section: Methodsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The questionnaire consisted of 23 questions related to 6 aspects: (i) Demographics and area of care; (ii) general anxiety score (measured using the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item [GAD-7] scale) [6]; (iii) rating of anxiety level in relation to caring for a patient with H1N1 infection, worry about contracting the disease or transmitting it to family members; (iv) self-reported compliance with infection control measures, including being vaccinated against influenza; (v) work avoidance behaviors; and (vi) perception of adequacy of information and preventive measures provided in the institution. The questionnaire surveyed respondents on whether they considered taking off-duty days and whether they considered changing their work schedule or reducing the frequency of patient care activities because of H1N1 cases in their work areas (Appendix 1).…”
Section: Study Design and Participantsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The total score was computed by summing each respondent's responses according to the GAD author's recommendation [6]. The following cut-off points were used: 1-4, mild anxiety; 5-9, moderate anxiety; 10-14, severe anxiety; and ≥ 15, very high or pathological anxiety.…”
Section: Study Design and Participantsmentioning
confidence: 99%