2016
DOI: 10.1590/s1679-45082016md3740
|View full text |Cite
|
Sign up to set email alerts
|

Sarcopenia and chemotherapy-mediated toxicity

Abstract: This narrative review focuses on the role of sarcopenia and chemotherapy-induced toxicity in cancer patients. Consistent evidence shows that sarcopenia in cancer patients leads to decreased overall survival by influencing treatment discontinuation and dose reduction. Therefore, sarcopenia should be considered a robust prognostic factor of negative outcome as well as a determinant of increased healthcare costs.

Help me understand this report

Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1

Citation Types

1
24
0
1

Year Published

2018
2018
2022
2022

Publication Types

Select...
9

Relationship

0
9

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 45 publications
(31 citation statements)
references
References 39 publications
(41 reference statements)
1
24
0
1
Order By: Relevance
“…In different series, sarcopenia has been identified before therapeutic intervention in 14% to 74% of cancer patients ( 34 , 97 99 ) where it has been shown to be associated with increased surgical complications, increased chemotherapy toxicity, and poorer outcomes, including poorer survival in multiple malignancies, including lung, breast, colorectal, renal cell, ovarian, hepatocellular cancer, and lymphoma ( 34 , 44 , 58 , 93 , 100 104 ). Older cancer patients with sarcopenia have been shown to experience increased toxicity with multiple chemotherapeutic agents including 5FU, capecitabine, cisplatin, anthracyclines, taxanes, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide ( 34 , 99 105 ). In addition, sarcopenia has been associated with increased toxicity of targeted agents such as sorafenib and sunitinib ( 106 109 ).…”
Section: Sarcopenia and Treatment Toxicity In Older Cancer Patientsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…In different series, sarcopenia has been identified before therapeutic intervention in 14% to 74% of cancer patients ( 34 , 97 99 ) where it has been shown to be associated with increased surgical complications, increased chemotherapy toxicity, and poorer outcomes, including poorer survival in multiple malignancies, including lung, breast, colorectal, renal cell, ovarian, hepatocellular cancer, and lymphoma ( 34 , 44 , 58 , 93 , 100 104 ). Older cancer patients with sarcopenia have been shown to experience increased toxicity with multiple chemotherapeutic agents including 5FU, capecitabine, cisplatin, anthracyclines, taxanes, etoposide, and cyclophosphamide ( 34 , 99 105 ). In addition, sarcopenia has been associated with increased toxicity of targeted agents such as sorafenib and sunitinib ( 106 109 ).…”
Section: Sarcopenia and Treatment Toxicity In Older Cancer Patientsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Low muscle has been associated with treatment toxicities, dose reductions, and early discontinuation of chemotherapy - all of which potentially compromise the effectiveness of adjuvant therapies which are being administered with curative intent. 24 Most chemotherapies are dosed based on body surface area (BSA in meters squared, m 2 ), for which the recommended milligrams per m 2 are derived from clinical trials assessing dose-limiting toxicities along with efficacy. Yet, many patients still experience severe toxicity and are subsequently dose-reduced, or treatment may be delayed or discontinued early.…”
Section: Associations With Treatment-related Toxicitiesmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Medical conditions such as cancer can contribute to and accelerate muscle loss leading to sarcopenia. In cancer patients, sarcopenia has been shown to lead to decreased overall survival (OS) and higher levels of morbidity [ 5 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Specifically, in lung cancer, sarcopenia has been associated with worse postoperative outcomes and poorer survival [ 6 ]. Many of the previous studies assessing the relationship between sarcopenia and clinical outcomes have studied cancer treatments consisting of chemotherapy and surgical procedures [ 5 , 7 ]. Unlike sarcopenia, in prior literature BMI appears to be associated with improvements in outcomes in lung cancer patients treated similarly [ 8 ].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%