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“…The control of growth hormone secretion is complex: it has been suggested that adrenergic mechanisms participate as well as dopaminergic and serotoninergic mechanisms (Imura & Kato, 1974) but the present findings lend no support to this.…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
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“…The control of growth hormone secretion is complex: it has been suggested that adrenergic mechanisms participate as well as dopaminergic and serotoninergic mechanisms (Imura & Kato, 1974) but the present findings lend no support to this.…”
Section: Discussioncontrasting
“…We have previously reported that oxprenolol did not alter prolactin levels in patients with essential hypertension (Lewis et al, 1979) but only single samples at clinic attendances were measured in that study. Little has been known of the role of beta adrenoceptors in controlling prolactin secretion, though isoprenaline infusion has been reported to increase prolactin levels (Imura & Kato, 1974). Chronic treatment of rats with propranolol can result in increased brain levels of dopamine (Morinan & Leonard, 1977) which in turn could reduce prolactin secretion (del Pozo & Fluckiger, 1973), and some B-adrenoceptor blockers affect 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors which might influence prolactin secretion through this possible relationship remains unresolved (Frantz, 1979).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Brain monoamines, such as norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin, play an important role in regulating GH se cretion [9,12,19,22] and depletion of these brain amines by reserpine or inhibition of the synthesis of catecholamines by a-methyl-p-tyrosine (a-MPT) reportedly inhibit episodic GH secretion [5,6] in conscious rats. Spontaneous GH bursts are also inhibited by DDC [23], a dopamine-P-hydroxylase inhibitor.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
“…Intraventricular administration of P-endorphin (5 pg/rat) also in creased the plasma GH levels which were lowered by phenoxybenzamine. These findings suggest that a-adrenergic me chanisms are involved in GH release induced by opioid peptides in the rat.Although there is accumulating evidence that both brain amines and small peptides present in the central nervous system influence the secretion of growth hormone (GH) [9,12,19,22], nevertheless, the relationship between biogenic amines and neuropeptides is poorly understood.Morphine stimulates GH release in the rat, possibly by acting through opiate receptors in the central nervous sys tem [18,21]. Identification of neuropeptides with opiate like activity led to the observations that opioid peptides such as P-endorphin, a-endorphin and Met5-enkephalin, stimulate GH secretion in the rat [4,13,24], We previously reported that GH secretion is stimulated also by FK 33-824, a potent Met5-enkephalin analog [25], given intravenously or intraventricularly into the anesthetized rat [14,15].…”
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