1998
DOI: 10.1111/j.1572-0241.1998.00231.x
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Abstract: Cirrhosis, possibly via high levels of endogenous estrogens, increases the risk of breast cancer in men.

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Cited by 76 publications
(17 citation statements)
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“…As in women, exposure to chest wall radiation, such as in patients previously treated with mantle radiation for Hodgkin's disease, increases the risk of subsequent breast cancer (Sasco et al, 1993). Alcohol use, liver disease, obesity, electromagnetic field radiation and diet have all been proposed as risk factors, but findings have been inconsistent (Hsing et al, 1998;Sorensen et al, 1998;Rosenblatt et al, 1999;Erren, 2001;Ewertz et al, 2001;Pollan et al, 2001;Weiderpass, 2001;Johnson, 2002).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…As in women, exposure to chest wall radiation, such as in patients previously treated with mantle radiation for Hodgkin's disease, increases the risk of subsequent breast cancer (Sasco et al, 1993). Alcohol use, liver disease, obesity, electromagnetic field radiation and diet have all been proposed as risk factors, but findings have been inconsistent (Hsing et al, 1998;Sorensen et al, 1998;Rosenblatt et al, 1999;Erren, 2001;Ewertz et al, 2001;Pollan et al, 2001;Weiderpass, 2001;Johnson, 2002).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Men with a body-mass index of greater than 30 have an almost doubled risk (4,29). Increased estrogen levels are also frequently seen in males with liver cirrhosis, increasing MBC risk 9-to 13-fold (7,30). Bilateral breast cancers have been reported in men exposed to exogenous estrogens, such as those treated for prostate cancer and transsexuals taking estrogen (4).…”
Section: Risk Factors For Mbcmentioning
confidence: 96%
“…Numerous etiologies have been elucidated, such as genetic mutations, especially BRCA2, and conditions associated with an imbalance between estrogen and testosterone. Certain medications, such as cimetidine [9,10], are hypothesized to increase the risk for male breast cancer via an estrogenic mechanism. Testicular infection, injury, or maldescent resulting in a relative deficiency of testosterone have been proposed as possible predisposing factors [11].…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%