2000
DOI: 10.1590/s0004-282x2000000600009
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Abstract: -Eighty-nine patients with lower cervical spine fractures or dislocations were evaluated for risk factors of neurological lesion. The age, sex, level and pattern of fracture and sagittal diameter of the spinal canal were analysed. There were no significant differences on the age, gender, level and Torg's ratio between intact patients and those with nerve root injury, incomplete or complete spinal cord injuries. Bilateral facet dislocations and burst fractures are a significant risk factor of spinal cord injury… Show more

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Cited by 18 publications
(10 citation statements)
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References 17 publications
(10 reference statements)
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“…Bravo et al [22] previously identified this situation as a significant risk factor for adverse neurological outcome. The finding that vertebral body fractures are significant risk factors for adverse neurological outcome is known in the literature [23]. …”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
See 1 more Smart Citation
“…Bravo et al [22] previously identified this situation as a significant risk factor for adverse neurological outcome. The finding that vertebral body fractures are significant risk factors for adverse neurological outcome is known in the literature [23]. …”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…They did not find a significant relation with the type of fracture and the neurological outcome. Coelho et al [23] previously identified risk factors for neurological lesions as a result of fractures and dislocations of the lower cervical spine. They showed that facet dislocations and burst fractures have a greater risk of spinal cord lesions in the lower cervical spine than other lesions.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The type and location of the CSI, along with hemodynamic stability, would influence the neurological outcome after intubation [64,66,67]. Coelho et al [66] suggested that bilateral facet dislocations and burst fractures have a greater risk of spinal cord lesion in lower C-spine trauma when compared with unilateral facet dislocations and other types of osteoligamentous lesions. It is also a known fact that efficiently performed direct laryngoscopy produces little movement below C3 [68].…”
Section: Considerations For Airway Management and Anesthesiamentioning
confidence: 99%
“…[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8] The socioeconomic realities, inadequate immediate attendant care, and the near-absent rehabilitation of people with SCI may be responsible in the developing countries. Studies 9,10 have identified many risk factors [10][11][12][13][14][15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22] for morbidity and mortality in SCI, but none of these risk factors has been studied in the developing world. Nigeria is a country without an organized prehospital transport system for trauma patients.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%