2006
DOI: 10.1590/s0100-879x2006000400015
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Abstract: Data were prospectively obtained from exclusively breast-fed healthy term neonates at birth and from healthy mothers with no obstetric complication to determine risk factors for excess weight loss and hypernatremia in exclusively breast-fed infants. Thirty-four neonates with a weight loss ≥10% were diagnosed between April 2001 and January 2005. Six of 18 infants who were eligible for the study had hypernatremia. Breast conditions associated with breast-feeding difficulties (P < 0.05), primiparity (P < 0.005), … Show more

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Cited by 40 publications
(32 citation statements)
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References 20 publications
(32 reference statements)
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“…Thus, the evaluation of other variables associated with weight loss and breastfeeding difficulties13 , 20 was not performed, which can be seen as a study limitation. Also, the longer duration of hospital length of stay after a cesarean delivery when compared to vaginal delivery would predispose to the observation of weight loss nadir in this first group 21.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…, 12 In these studies, the factors associated with weight loss are multiple and among them is the cesarean delivery. On the other hand, there have been few studies in newborns that are exclusively breastfed3 , 13 and in Baby-Friendly Hospitals 1415 The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors for weight loss greater than 8% in full-term newborns that are exclusively breastfed in a Baby-Friendly Hospital.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Despite the proven benefits of breastfeeding, dehydration and poor weight gain after birth are common among infants, who are breastfed. These conditions are often preventable and if diagnosed early, they will not have long-term effects on infants (14,22,23).…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Weight loss rate among infants with hypernatremia has been reported from 8% to 30% (12). Hypernatremic dehydration is a potentially destructive condition, which occurs in infants, who lose weight excessively (13,14) and can cause serious medical complications and even death. Thus, identification of factors associated with EWL could be helpful in the prevention and treatment of complications (15).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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