2011
DOI: 10.1111/j.1369-1600.2010.00285.x View full text |Buy / Rent full text
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Abstract: Little is known how social interaction, if offered as an alternative to drug consumption, affects neural circuits involved in drug reinforcement and substance dependence. Conditioned place preference (CPP) for cocaine (15 mg/kg i.p.) or social interaction (15 minutes) as an alternative stimulus was investigated in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Four social interaction episodes with a male adult conspecific completely reversed cocaine CPP and were even able to prevent reacquisition of cocaine CPP. Social interaction… Show more

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“…Examples of social influences ameliorating desire for drug may involve the opportunity for social interaction during the later stages of drug abuse. As discussed earlier, cocaine CPP is reversed in rats that are given social interaction episodes after the establishment of CPP (Fritz et al, 2011b). Cocaine CPP established in isolate housed mice also is reversed by a period of living in enriched housing before the CPP test (Solinas et al, 2008).…”
Section: Implications For Prevention and Treatment Of Drug Abusementioning
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“…Examples of social influences ameliorating desire for drug may involve the opportunity for social interaction during the later stages of drug abuse. As discussed earlier, cocaine CPP is reversed in rats that are given social interaction episodes after the establishment of CPP (Fritz et al, 2011b). Cocaine CPP established in isolate housed mice also is reversed by a period of living in enriched housing before the CPP test (Solinas et al, 2008).…”
Section: Implications For Prevention and Treatment Of Drug Abusementioning
“…Activation of accumbal shell, amygdala (central and basolateral nuclei), and ventral tegmental area as measured by expression of zif268 in response to a cocaine-conditioned environment is blunted by the presence of social reward-conditioned cues (Fritz et al, 2011b). Lesion experiments also suggest dissociable contributions of some of these regions to drug versus social reward.…”
Section: Psychosocial Influences and Abused Drugsmentioning
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“…In rats, only 4 episodes of social interaction are sufficient to not only reverse place preference from cocaine to social interaction, but also to inhibit the cocaine-induced reexpression of cocaine-conditioned place preference (CPP) [4,5]. Furthermore, in a concurrent CPP paradigm, intraperitoneal injections of 15 mg/kg cocaine and social interaction compete as rewards of the same reward strength [4,6]. Mice exhibit similar behavioral effects but with a higher sensitivity to cocaine [7].…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
“…Accordingly, we propose that the presence of companions may prevent the stressinduced morphological changes in dentate granule cells, in part, via the companion odormediated olfactory activation and reinstatement of local BDNF expression in dentate gyrus. In addition to companion-induced olfactory activation, companions' physical contact has been demonstrated to display reward-modulating effects [44][45][46][47]. Unconditioned foot shock as we used in our stressor regimen has been reported to enhance physical contact and aggressive attack in mice [48].…”
Section: The Presence Of Companions Prevents Such Stressor-induced Momentioning