Search citation statements

Order By: Relevance

Paper Sections

Select...
2
1
1
1

Citation Types

0
11
0
1

Year Published

2000
2000
2007
2007

Publication Types

Select...
4

Relationship

1
3

Authors

Journals

citations
Cited by 31 publications
(12 citation statements)
references
References 9 publications
0
11
0
1
Order By: Relevance
“…This has been widely accepted by the neuroprosthesis users, and the same principle has been applied to pronation and supination control [25]. It is a simple and natural control method that does not require additional proportional command signals and is easily learned and controlled.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…This has been widely accepted by the neuroprosthesis users, and the same principle has been applied to pronation and supination control [25]. It is a simple and natural control method that does not require additional proportional command signals and is easily learned and controlled.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…Stimulation of triceps, 43 pronator quadratus, 182 and finger intrinsics 177 increases work space and enhances overall upper-limb and hand function. The incorporation of alternative command source strategies including wrist position, 125 activation of voluntary antagonists to control elbow angle and forearm supination/pronation, 182 myoelectric signal from either forearm or neck muscles, 159 and cortical control 306 are under investigation.…”
Section: System Componentsmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The user can then use retained voluntary control in antagonist muscles to balance or overcome the stimulation of paralyzed muscles to maintain fixed arm positions or to move the limb to other parts of the workspace. A similar approach has been described for control of elbow flexion-extension [5], [23] and forearm pronation-supination [20]. Although elegantly simple because it exploits the subject's retained voluntary control while requiring no artificial sensors, the constant stimulation required by this strategy may accelerate the onset of fatigue in both the stimulated muscles and the voluntary muscles against which they are acting.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 94%
“…Trials with different movement types, different loads, and different speeds were performed in a random order. To prevent fatigue, the number of trials (16)(17)(18)(19)(20) and trial duration (30 seconds) were reduced for spinal cord injured subjects, and all movements were unloaded in these individuals. A rest period of at least 60 s separated consecutive trials in all experiments.…”
Section: ) Motion Data Acquisition: An Optotrak Motion Analysismentioning
confidence: 99%