1984
DOI: 10.1001/archderm.120.12.1585
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Response of mycosis fungoides to topical chemotherapy with mechlorethamine

Abstract: Seventy-six patients with mycosis fungoides (MF) were given topical mechlorethamine hydrochloride therapy. Allergic contact hypersensitivity reactions to the drug developed in 51 patients (67.1%). Sixty-four patients of the original 76 continued therapy, with 43 (67.2%) achieving a complete remission and 12 (18.8%) achieving a partial remission. Stage I disease responded significantly better than did subsequent, more severe disease stages. The median times to complete remission were 5.6 months, 32.3 months, an… Show more

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Cited by 12 publications
(25 citation statements)
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“…3,7,[22][23][24] The most common adverse reaction is CIM, defined by erythema and pruritus at the site of application. [1][2][3] In our study, 23 (53%) of the 43 patients developed CIM; this percentage is similar to those reported in the literature. 14,18,19 In several previous studies, 2,6,8,9,12,18 the frequencies of CIM in patients were 38%, 49%, 57%, 58%, 70%, and 83%.…”
Section: Commentsupporting
confidence: 91%
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“…3,7,[22][23][24] The most common adverse reaction is CIM, defined by erythema and pruritus at the site of application. [1][2][3] In our study, 23 (53%) of the 43 patients developed CIM; this percentage is similar to those reported in the literature. 14,18,19 In several previous studies, 2,6,8,9,12,18 the frequencies of CIM in patients were 38%, 49%, 57%, 58%, 70%, and 83%.…”
Section: Commentsupporting
confidence: 91%
“…The most common initial manifestations of MF are patches and plaques on the skin. 1 Initial treatments include topical mechlorethamine hydrochloride, topical carmustine, topical corticosteroids, psoralen-UV-A (PUVA), UV-B radiation, and total skin electron beam radiation. [2][3][4][5] Topical mechlorethamine therapy is a convenient and effective treatment, especially for elderly patients who can easily prepare it at home.…”
Section: Discussionmentioning
confidence: 99%
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“…15,32,33 The reported probability of hypersensitivity reactions varies from less than 10% to as much as 67%, although these are less likely with the ointment formulation. 15,[32][33][34][35] Therapy is usually continued for 6 months after the clearance of skin lesions. 15 HN 2 has also been reported to induce repigmentation in hypopigmented MF lesions.…”
Section: Topical Hn 2 Mechlorethaminementioning
confidence: 99%
“…14,15 Previous studies reporting the therapeutic effects of nitrogen mustard are based on older, retrospective studies, with the majority focusing on early-stages of MF and data are mostly confined to short duration of treatment and a small number of patients. [16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25] To assess the difference in treatment response in all stages of the disease, we have analyzed the treatment response in MF according to T-stages and in parapsoriasis according to the extent of skin involvement, separately. No previous studies have evaluated the treatment response in patients with parapsoriasis separately.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%