2017 IEEE Transportation Electrification Conference and Expo, Asia-Pacific (ITEC Asia-Pacific) 2017
DOI: 10.1109/itec-ap.2017.8080773
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Cited by 4 publications
(4 citation statements)
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“…For one electric railway, the frequencies of the harmonic resonance accidents occurring at different time are the same according to the theoretical analysis and the field test data [28,29]. On the other hand, the simulation result also validates the on-site test of this device [30].…”
Section: Measurement Results Of Frequency-dependent Impedancementioning
confidence: 54%
“…For one electric railway, the frequencies of the harmonic resonance accidents occurring at different time are the same according to the theoretical analysis and the field test data [28,29]. On the other hand, the simulation result also validates the on-site test of this device [30].…”
Section: Measurement Results Of Frequency-dependent Impedancementioning
confidence: 54%
“…The traditional control method of traction converter [37] uses a double closed‐loop control strategy combining DC voltage outer loop and AC current inner loop, the DC voltage loop is used to control the stability of DC bus voltage and its output is used as the input of the current loop. In the case of multiple converters operating in parallel and the existence of multiple controllers, the CPS‐PWM [1–3, 5, 6] modulation strategy is often used, this method is implemented through a set of uniformly staggered carriers, carriers are usually initialised at the zero phase angle point of the grid voltage, the topology of the traditional control methods are shown in Figure 6. There are two common traditional control methods [38, 39], Figure 6a is a method based on direct current control (DCC), and Figure 6b is a method based on dq decoupling control (DQDC).…”
Section: Traditional Control Strategies and Problem Formulationmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The TPSS is a complex multi-conductor transmission line with distributed inductance and capacitance, and a non-linear strong coupling relationship between the train and the network. Due to the action of the switching devices of the grid-side converter (four-quadrant converter, 4QC) of the locomotive, high-frequency harmonic currents with the same impedance characteristic frequency of the traction network may be generated, exciting high resonant overvoltage [1][2][3]6]. This high-frequency resonance phenomenon may lead to harmonic amplification, with the consequent problems of severe voltage distortion, overheating, vibration, noise, and losses in electrical equipment such as power capacitors and traction transformers, as well as incorrect operation of protective devices and electromagnetic interference (EMI) on track circuits and communication lines [4][5][6]19], which have serious implications for the safe and stable operation of trains.…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%
“…The harmonic spectra of the AC side current can be derived by applying the Fourier transform to the pulse width modulation (PWM) (Mouton et al, 2014;Kostic et al, 2013). Several inherent harmonic resonance frequencies exist according to the impedance-frequency characteristics of the traction network (Holtz and Kelin, 1989;Zhang et al, 2017;Qiujiang et al, 2018). The harmonic current generated by the VSC flows into the traction network through the point-of-commoncoupling (PCC) for the L-N system (Tan et al, 2005).…”
Section: Introductionmentioning
confidence: 99%